6 MAI 1991 ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DE L'ONTARIO

The House met at 1330.

Prayers.

MEMBERS' STATEMENTS

EDUCATION PROGRAM EVALUATION

Mr Beer: Today I ask the Minister of Education to reverse her decision to withdraw Ontario from the national school achievement indicators program sponsored by the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada.

The goal of this project is to provide a Canadian information base that will enable provincial ministries of education to assess the performance of their education programs in comparison with Canada-wide standards. During hearings before the Ontario select committee on education from 1987 to 1990 many participants decried the lack of meaningful data on the performance standards of our education systems. This national program would help in establishing Canadian criteria, data and outcomes that would help us to improve our educational programs for all our students.

We all recognize that standardized tests alone are not a fair measure of any education system, but as part of a broader evaluation process they are a vital tool. Indeed, as the council's background document on this issue makes clear, there is growing agreement on the value of monitoring and evaluating educational systems at all levels. This has led to increased collaboration among the provinces in comparative studies of student achievement and the development of educational indicators.

I believe that the concerns as to how socioeconomic and cultural differences are reflected in the proposed school achievement indicators program can be addressed and overcome and that Ontario can and should participate. This project is one example where all the provinces, including Quebec, have agreed on a positive, far-reaching initiative. This is not the time for Ontario to opt out.

OATH OF ALLEGIANCE

Mr Jackson: I call the attention of all members of the House to a resolution passed at the beginning of Police Week, yesterday, by the Municipal Police Authorities association to ask the Rae government to reinstate the name of the Queen back into the police oath of allegiance.

The Premier's arbitrary decision to remove the name of the Queen from that oath has been met by strong opposition from all sectors of Ontario society. I know that many members of our police services have been upset and angered by it as well.

Yesterday Ontario's police sent a clear message to the Premier that they wish to stand in defence of Canadian values and traditions, including the monarchy and explicit reference to the Queen of Canada in their oath.

On behalf of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, I would like to congratulate the association for its stand. I would also like to announce the start of a petition campaign, to be conducted by our party, to collect as many signatures as possible from concerned citizens to have Her Majesty's name reinstated in the police oath.

I urge all who wish to sign the petition to contact a member of the Ontario PC caucus. This petition will give the citizens of Ontario an opportunity to tell the Premier that what he has done without public consultation is unacceptable to them and that he must undo the damage he has inflicted on our Canadian heritage. They will also be able to remind the Premier, who must take a responsible position at the constitutional table, about the great unifying role exercised by the crown as our foremost symbol and guarantor of Canadian national identity and parliamentary democracy.

WORKWEEK

Ms S. Murdock: On Tuesday night at 7:30, if members do not have a meeting, hopefully they will be watching TVOntario.

The average person spends the majority of his or her waking hours at work. It is our sole preoccupation for at least 40 hours per week for most of our lives. Yet up until now work and workers are often considered invisible, while sports or other leisure time activities absorb the attention of the media. Work, or at least most kinds of work, is often seen as the means to an end rather than something inherently interesting and creative in and of itself.

Last week I was honoured to speak at the official launch for WorkWeek, a TVOntario-CBC program that finally acknowledges something that we have known for a long time: Love it or hate it, work is one of the single most interesting and crucial experiences in life.

Congratulations to TVOntario and CBC Newsworld for recognizing the need for a program that looks at workplace issues and for taking the initiative to get it on the air. This program hits the waves at a time when the workplace is battered by layoffs and business closures. It is a challenge to the way that business is done. Labour, management and business must tackle problems differently.

I urge everyone in this House and at home to watch WorkWeek every Tuesday night at 7:30. It offers a weekly forum for in-depth discussions on work issues.

Congratulations and keep up the good work.

HAZARDOUS WASTE

Mrs Sullivan: On 18 April I asked the Minister of the Environment to step in with the money for the immediate cleanup of the X-Pert Metal Finishing site on Dillon Road in Burlington.

The site contains some 3,000 to 5,000 gallons of cyanide chemicals and an equal volume of acid. Together this is a lethal combination. Later that afternoon, the Ministry of the Environment issued a control order requiring the company and its directors to clean up toxic chemicals at the site. That order allowed for a 15-day appeal period.

Public concern is very high. This is evident from the contents of a petition from residents which I brought to the Legislature on 23 April. As well, the city of Burlington has passed a strong resolution requesting the minister to expedite the cleanup of the site.

The 15-day period allowed for appeal expired 3 May. The minister must act now. The chemicals are stored in an unsegregated fashion in deteriorated containers. The site is not fully fenced and part of it is accessible to children through an orchard. Houses are located as close as 50 feet to the site and the area close to the site is densely populated.

There is clear reason to expect that the owners, who have not met their previous obligations, will not meet their obligations to clean up the site now, with or without an order. The Minister of the Environment must step in, clean up the site and remove the toxic chemicals and the danger to the community. She has the authority. She must act now. The people in Burlington expect it.

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HIGHWAY SAFETY

Mr Arnott: Today I would like to talk about a subject which has received very little attention from the present government. It is the very serious matter of death, injury and destruction on our roads and highways.

In co-operation with police and the insurance industry, the Ministry of Transportation, on 30 April, announced a two-week campaign called Slow Down and Survive, essentially a province-wide crackdown on speeders and bad drivers. The Insurance Bureau of Canada has contributed $100,000 to the promotion campaign and the Ministry of Transportation a paltry $8,000, indicating this ministry's relative lack of commitment to this very serious matter of highway safety.

Statistics show that 4,221 people were killed and more than 284,000 were injured on our roads in 1989. Traffic accidents remain the number one cause of death for Canadians under 45. Coupled with this human tragedy are the economic costs which are incurred every time a personal injury accident occurs, ranging from acute hospital care to insurance claims and long-term disability.

This government must assume a stronger leadership role in addressing this crucial issue. Well-planned, co-ordinated initiatives must be undertaken by the ministry in partnership with broader private industry and interest group involvement to reduce fatalities and accidents on our roads.

Without question, the Ontario Provincial Police continue to perform their responsibilities for ensuring safety on our highways with competence and professionalism. This task is not theirs alone. Too often we seem to accept death on the highway as a fact of life. Steps must be taken to change this attitude. Change will not be achieved if this government persists in its gimmicky, Band-Aid approach to solving serious problems.

APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING

Mr Mammoliti: I rise today to pay tribute to the fine work being done by Local 27 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America in its apprenticeship and training program.

At its training centre, located at 64 Signet Drive in my riding of Yorkview, Local 27, in co-operation with the Toronto Construction Association and the Ministry of Skills Development, runs apprenticeship programs aimed at preparing the apprentice of today for the technological demands of the future.

Since the opening of the Patrick J. Campbell Training and Rehabilitation Centre in 1986, the apprenticeship program has advanced and enhanced the skills of nearly 900 young men and women. In addition, this truly remarkable educational facility has achieved a 97% placement rate for its students.

The building industry in Ontario will remain strong and vibrant only if we continue to educate and replenish the industry with a skilled and competent labour force. The carpenters of Local 27 have shown their desire to contribute to a better and stronger future by providing an apprenticeship facility second to none.

They, along with the Toronto Construction Association and the Ministry of Skills Development, should be proud of the fine work they are doing, as I am proud of wearing this United Brotherhood of Carpenters jacket. I realize that I am not allowed to wear the hat, but if I did I would tip my hat to the carpenters.

SEVERANCE PAYMENT AND TERMINATION HEARINGS

Mr Cleary: As all members of the Legislature are aware, Cornwall and the surrounding area have been hit hard by the recession. In fact, we are suffering an unfortunately high number of plant closures and layoffs.

Under such dire circumstances, it would only appear normal to expect support from this government. However, I believe the Ministry of Labour's procedures are aimed at hurting, not helping, the former employees of Courtaulds Fibres Canada (BCL).

After originally scheduling the severance payment and termination hearings for over 200 employees of BCL in Cornwall, it has come to my attention that the Ministry of Labour will be relocating these hearings to Ottawa.

The reason given, inadequate accommodation, is garbage. As these hearings are indeed still booked for local conference facilities, the minister knows full well that the riding of Cornwall can very well accommodate the needs of these hearings.

By relocating the hearings to Ottawa, the Ministry of Labour is sending a clear message that its hearings are neither accessible nor open. These hearings have been scheduled in Cornwall and must remain in Cornwall. The sheer distance and disturbance of travelling to Ottawa for four consecutive days is unnecessary, an additional burden for both the claimants and the company representatives of Courtaulds. I request the Minister of Labour to instruct the acting deputy minister, Jean Read, to revert back to the original plans.

ORDER OF BUSINESS

Mr Sterling: The members of our caucus, as representatives of many Ontarians, are angry. We are angry and frustrated by the atrocious budget which was introduced by the New Democratic government one week ago today. The anger has not gone away as the days have passed into a week. In fact, it has become more intensified as we watch and listen to individual Ontarians react to this budget. If the NDP's members made themselves available to the general public over the weekend, I am sure that they would have got this message.

The members of our caucus believe that the government is using the routine procedures of this House, specifically the ministerial statements, to deflect the tension away from this outrageous budget, that it is making ministerial statements unnecessarily long and drawn out and that it is attempting to market its schemes as good news announcements in order to deter the attention of members of this House and the general public.

Therefore, I move that this House pass directly to oral questions immediately following the completion of members' statements today.

The Speaker: Any member is entitled to make a motion at just about any time. It requires unanimous consent. Do we have unanimous consent to move --

Some hon members: No.

The Speaker: No? Okay.

DEVELOPMENT DEPOSITS

Mr Perruzza: I am both alarmed and shocked about recent actions taken by North York city council in returning approximately $25 million to developers in North York's downtown which rightfully belongs, according to city rules, to the taxpayers of the city of North York. Mayor Mel Lastman and North York council have set a double standard which favours developers while denying the taxpayers of the city of North York the opportunity to have their property taxes decreased by approximately 10%.

Developers, while receiving hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of zoning approvals, were required to promise to the city that they would begin constructing the projects within one year of approval. Developers vying for these lucrative zonings were required to post a deposit which would be forfeited if they reneged on their commitment to build. Their time expired and the developers did not keep their promise. Consequently, they should have forfeited their deposits to the city of North York. Instead, in a municipal election year, Mayor Mel Lastman and North York council in a quiet meeting decided to give developers a big break and returned approximately $25 million worth of deposits.

Mayor Lastman and council are quick to forgive developers in tough economic times, but when home owners who cannot afford to pay high property taxes require relief and file poverty appeals with the city of North York, they are not as quick to forgive these taxpayers.

VISITOR

The Speaker: Before continuing, I would like to ask all members of the assembly to recognize in the Speaker's gallery today state senator of Nebraska and chairman of the Midwestern Legislative Conference, Senator Gerald Conway.

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ORDER OF BUSINESS

Mr Sterling: On a point of order, Mr Speaker: I assume that you asked for unanimous consent of this House on my motion on the basis of standing order 44. Is that correct?

The Speaker: Yes.

Mr Sterling: I believe that is incorrect in that this motion was not a motion to either adjourn the House or adjourn the debate. It was a motion which was recognized in this House last week in terms of moving the procedures ahead.

I noticed in your judgement or your ruling last week, Mr Speaker, that you said that the motion to jump from one part of the proceedings to another part of the proceedings was a dilatory motion and you drew the analogy, as did Mr Edighoffer, our former Speaker, to these two motions for adjournment of the debate and adjournment of the House.

I want to say that I do not think it was contemplated, either by you, the Speaker, or the previous Speaker, that such a motion would ever be put in front of this House. Therefore, I think the strict analogy between the motion which I now propose and a motion to adjourn the House and a motion to adjourn the debate is wrong, and I say that for a number of reasons.

Mr Speaker, in your ruling of 2 May, on page 1158, you indicate that these types of motions are tactical, and that is true; they are tactical. The two previous motions, which were moved in both cases by either the government House leader or a government minister, were used as tactics by the government of the day to avoid tactics by the opposition, and they were ruled in order at that time. In both of those cases, the ruling by Speaker Edighoffer and yourself with regard to whether or not the tactical move was the same as an adjournment of the debate and an adjournment of the House, as considered specifically under rule 44, was really an overture or an extra ruling which was not required at that time. Therefore, I do not consider it binding on the Chair in terms of dealing with this particular motion.

Second, what is good for the goose is good for the gander as well. I would say that if the government has the right to introduce motions during routine proceedings to omit part of those routine proceedings, then surely it is within the ambit of the opposition to introduce a motion during the routine proceedings to omit part of the routine proceedings which it does not want to be involved in.

I think another very important point here is that rule 44(a), which is the one we are talking about today, is a rule which says that motions to adjourn the House or adjourn the debate cannot be put before question period. The meaning and the intention of that ruling, as far as I have always read it is concerned, and I think anyone reading it would think so, would be that the government, using its majority, cannot deny the opposition benches the right of questioning the government of the day in each legislative day.

Mr Speaker, my motion, which I have placed in front of you, does not deny the opposition its right to the question period. In fact, the way the motion is framed is such that it would encourage us to get along to question period and omit the ministerial statements, for the reasons I put in my particular statement.

The purpose of this rule is to protect the opposition in terms of dealing with this government and getting at it in terms of questions. I do not believe the ruling that a dilatory motion like this necessarily comes under rule 44(a) is necessary or right. I believe what you are doing, Mr Speaker, is taking away a right of the opposition when in fact previous Speakers have given that self-same right to the governments of the day, as was exhibited by the last government during the motions part of proceedings and by this present government during the introduction of bills.

Therefore, I would ask you to reflect upon this point of order, adjourn this House for 15 minutes and then come back and give us a ruling on it. I am sure you will find the motion in order.

Hon Mr Cooke: I am sure that the member for the Conservative Party will remember that when this matter was dealt with under Speaker Edighoffer, his party and my party in opposition made a couple of points with respect to moving to orders of the day. The number one point was that we wanted to avoid the opposition parties having their right to ask questions taken away by the government, as the member has pointed out.

Also, part of the standing orders of our rules very clearly allows the government ministers to make statements where the opposition parties have always said we should be making them, and that is in the House rather than out in the public without being held accountable in the Legislature. That is certainly a rule that we in this government want to continue to follow. Mr Speaker, if you are to accept the point being made by the acting House leader for the Conservative Party, it would also remove the right for the opposition parties to reply to policy statements by the government.

Clearly the ruling that was made by Speaker Edighoffer was made so that the motion to move to orders of the day could only be made at the point at which he suggested, which is clearly to protect the government's right to make announcements and the opposition's right to hold the government accountable, and I think that ruling is as applicable today as it was then.

The Speaker: To the member for Carleton, first with respect to the motion which he attempted to place earlier, I have already ruled on this matter. I do appreciate very much the member bringing this matter to my attention. It is a serious point. It is one which I will reflect upon, and I will be reporting back to you as soon as possible. My preference will be tomorrow, and I will come back with a ruling. I do appreciate the member bringing it to my attention.

SCHOOL TRANSFER

The Speaker: At the same time, at the close of last Thursday's question period the member for Burlington South rose on a point of order concerning an exchange between two members in that day's question period. The member asked me to review Hansard, and I have since had an opportunity to review and reflect on the appropriate passages from Hansard. I am now in a position to report to the House.

Members will know that the Minister of Education indicated at page 1153 of Hansard that she was distressed that she was being "misrepresented in terms of my position and our government's position with respect to the school accommodation issue."

These remarks were made in response to a question from the member for Essex South, but they did not specifically allude to him or to any other member. Therefore, I do not find that the remarks of the minister transgress our standing orders.

I would be remiss if I did not indicate to all honourable members, and indeed remind them, that they should conduct themselves with dignity, decorum and respect, not only for the letter of our standing orders but for the spirit of those orders.

Mr Mancini: On a point of order, Mr Speaker: If she was responding to a question from myself, whom do you think she was alluding to if she was not alluding directly to me?

The Speaker: To the member for Essex South, I reviewed the Hansard and there is no reference to any individual.

ORDER OF BUSINESS

Mr Sterling: On this point of order, Mr Speaker: During members' statements I moved that this House pass directly to oral questions immediately upon the completion of members' statements today. You stood in your place and indicated you needed unanimous consent to that motion, and I had to assume or presume the grounds upon which you were making that particular request. I have asked you on a point of order why this particular motion is not in order. Your ruling from 2 May does not cover this kind of motion, and therefore that is why I suggested we adjourn for 15 minutes in order for you to be able to consider the matter, because your ruling today, while some might treat it as less important than I, is important for the opposition, to know whether it has the same rights as the government does in dealing with routine proceedings.

The Speaker: I have ruled on this matter and I have reported to you that I will deliberate on the point you have raised and will report back to the House. It is time for ministers' statements.

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STATEMENTS BY THE MINISTRY

OMA AGREEMENT

Hon Ms Lankin: I am delighted today to be able to provide some details to members regarding the ratification of the new agreement between the Ontario Medical Association and the government of Ontario.

This landmark agreement is the first in Ontario that reflects a determined effort to bring uncontrolled health costs into check. It was approved by the OMA council on the weekend.

Members may be aware of an internal OMA legal challenge to the ratification process. I have every confidence that the matter will be resolved soon. We will continue preparations to implement the agreement and will have everything in place when the OMA informs us it has acted on proper authority.

With the ratification of this agreement, Ontario's health care system is much healthier. Working together in a co-ordinated effort, we will foster efficiency and high quality where before there was misallocation and inattention. The heart of the system, fiscal management, will no longer have the overspending that had threatened medicare.

As the Treasurer said in the budget last week, to maintain a high quality of life in the midst of changing times we must establish new social partnerships to better manage our resources. Our new agreement with the Ontario Medical Association is an excellent example of the co-operative approach that will bring effective management.

This agreement brings to the system a new, co-operative approach to management that will allow for the kind of health care planning this province has always needed.

The very first page of the framework agreement sets out our common goals. For the first time in this province, physicians have committed themselves as a group to maintain the principles of medicare, with equal access to all our citizens.

Physicians have agreed to help the government achieve more value for health care spending in Ontario. They have agreed to help achieve the appropriate number, mix and distribution of physicians based on Ontario's needs.

A joint management committee, with representatives from the OMA and from government, will work to enhance the quality and effectiveness of medical care, including the pursuit of more value for existing spending.

The JMC will develop action plans to look at issues raised both by physicians and government. The plans will suggest areas of improvement and develop ways to implement those improvements. Those areas include such things as drug utilization, appropriate use of hospitals and waiting list registries. Each plan will suggest areas of improvement and consider effective ways to make those improvements.

It will constantly monitor our medical system, recommending new ways to improve care while making sure the people of Ontario are getting the most for their scarce tax dollars.

The committee will also provide a forum for physicians and government to work together, to end the animosity that has for too long characterized relations between the two parties. We both serve the people of this province. When we work together, that service will improve significantly.

Let me take a moment to put some figures in perspective. Total health care spending in Ontario this year will comprise about one third of our entire budget expenditure -- $17 billion. Fees for physicians alone last year accounted for about 10% of provincial expenditures -- more than $4 billion. Before this agreement, skyrocketing increases were beginning to shake the very foundations of medicare.

This collaborative effort with our physicians will result in immediate savings to the people of Ontario.

Over the last 10 years, payments to fee-for-service physicians have been increasing at an average annual rate of 12%. Even with a fee increase of under 2% in 1988-89 and zero fee increases in 1989-90 and 1990-91, physician payments in the two years without increases jumped nearly $400 million. That is because there was no management system in place to control utilization, the growth of volume of services.

This year, per capita utilization is budgeted for a growth of 1.5%. If per capita utilization grows above that number, the government will be reimbursed for half of the excess from the total pool allotted for fee-for-service physicians.

The result is a system that provides a strong incentive for doctors to help in the process of bringing health care costs under control.

In 1977-78, OHIP payments accounted for 24% of Ontario's spending on health care. This year the health insurance portion will have mushroomed to about 32%. Not surprisingly, those increasing health insurance payments have come at the expense of other components of the health care sector and other government priorities.

This year, fee-for-service doctors will receive a total increase of 3.95%. In dollar terms for 1991-92, the increase for fee and utilization will cost about $250 million. That is an increase of just under 7%, a full 5% below the recent historical average. That 5% represents a saving of $180 million in just one year.

Because Ontario doctors have not had a fee increase since 1989, the agreement provides for a one-time payment in lieu of a fee increase of 2% for each of the last two years at a cost of about $140 million. ln addition, the government has agreed to provide malpractice insurance assistance for this year and the past two years at a cost of $84 million. These one-time payments will not be incorporated in the base amount for determining future fee increases.

As well, individual doctors will face limits on gross fee-for-service billings. Physicians billing above $400,000 will have excess fees discounted by one third. Amounts above $450,000 will be discounted by two thirds. The threshold levels will be adjusted annually. The money saved by this measure will be used to pay for natural growth in the system, such as increases in population. These thresholds will encourage doctors to make high quality their priority, not high volume of high billings.

The economic portion of the agreement also features a new mechanism to settle disputes over monetary issues between the two sides. Dispute resolution will help us to achieve a fairness that this government considers a central principle.

The most important achievement is the creation of a system of management. For the first time since the introduction of medicare in 1971, there will be an annual budget for medical spending in this province. Government and the medical profession, in partnership, will stay within that budget. The days of open-ended medical spending are over. This government is establishing proper control over this essential social program.

We are moving away at last from the haphazard insurance system of the past to a planned system, a managed system.

The people of Ontario have clearly said that preservation of medicare is on the top of their priority list. That is one of the reasons they elected a social democratic government. They know our commitment to universal health care.

With this agreement we will not only preserve medicare; we will improve it. We have made sure that the people of Ontario will continue to have access to the highest-quality medical care at a cost they can afford.

ARTS AND CULTURE FUNDING / SUBVENTIONS POUR LES ARTS ET LA CULTURE

Hon Mr Marchese: In his budget announcement last week, my colleague the Treasurer recognized that culture is an important and growing industry.

En présentant son budget la semaine dernière, mon collègue le Trésorier a reconnu que la culture est une importante industrie croissante.

The Treasurer announced that $7.5 million has been allocated in the provincial budget as an increase to the annual base funding of the Ontario Arts Council. When added to the annual inflation allowance, the OAC budgetary increase in 1991-92 is over 25%.

With the additional $7.5 million in annual funding, the OAC will be able to create and provide strengthened links between education and the arts, more assistance to francophone and regional communities, more and larger individual grants to artists and organizations and secured operating grants to organizations for audience development.

In addition, we will see an arts council in this province that will truly reflect the multiracial, multicultural and multilingual makeup of Ontario.

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De plus, nous aurons dans cette province un conseil des arts qui reflète véritablement la composition multiraciale, multiculturelle et multilingue de l'Ontario.

When the Ontario Arts Council was established in 1963, there were fewer than two dozen publicly supported arts organizations in this province. Today, the council supports some 46 orchestras, 32 public art galleries, 3 visual arts schools, 6 first nations groups, 11 folk festivals, 46 theatre companies and 24 dance companies. That is in addition to over 1,600 individual artists who receive project funding. The OAC has a history of expanding to meet the needs of a flourishing Ontario cultural community and industry.

Today, the cultural sector employs over 75,000 people in Ontario: writers, choreographers, composers, visual artists, dancers, musicians, crafts persons, filmmakers, designers, actors, technicians, administrators and others. Representing nearly half of Canada's artistic activity and resources, the Ontario arts sector has very significant direct and indirect impacts on Ontario's economy. This boom reflects the wealth of talent, skill, ingenuity and creativity of the many rich and diverse cultural roots of this province.

Nous savons que la culture nous sert à trouver des emplois, à rester en contact les uns avec les autres, à ne pas oublier qui nous sommes, et elle nous indique ce que nous pourrions devenir.

But this week's budget announcement moves our understanding a step beyond this critical role. As a government, we appreciate that the cultural sector is the fourth largest industry in Canada in terms of labour force. The economic impact of the arts and culture sector is about equivalent to that of mines and metals -- larger than textiles, clothing and furniture. Yet almost a third of Canada's artists live below the poverty line. This is as likely to be true of accomplished, acclaimed performers, writers or visual artists with years of training and experience behind them as it is of a young person just starting out.

The vast majority of cultural workers are unprotected by unemployment insurance, health and safety benefits and the kind of routine protection we have fought to earn for other workers.

Les femmes, les autochtones et des minorités ethni-ques, raciales et linguistiques sont parmi les groupes de travailleurs culturels le plus souvent sous-employés, sousreprésentés et les moins bien payés. Ce sont eux également qui le plus souvent subventionnent notre culture collective par leur travail bénévole.

Women, members of the first nations, and racial, linguistic and ethnic minorities are the most underemployed, underpaid and under-represented among our cultural workers. They are also the ones who most often subsidize our collective culture with their volunteer labour.

Many culturally diverse arts groups have limited access to public funds, and the arts sector itself is in serious financial trouble.

We need to ensure access to public funding for emerging groups and for those groups that have been shut out in the past. This means eliminating cultural or regional biases and supporting the growing number of artists and groups, particularly among first nations, francophone and other racial, linguistic and cultural communities.

I believe that the main challenge for this province and our country today is to create conditions in which we can live together in mutual respect. We need a society which protects what we want to be without destroying the right of others to be different and proud of it. This aspiration is not a new one, but it happens to be this generation that has acquired the need to make it possible.

A final point: Unlike other economic sectors, the arts cannot rely solely on market forces for revenue. Limited and falling private sector sponsorship, free trade, the recession and its effects on dwindling audiences and a decline in federal government funding have left many artists and artistic agencies in a financial crisis.

Canadian cultural products are systematically undercut by mass-produced imports: 76% of books sold in Canada are foreign; 97% of theatrical screen time is US-produced; 90% of TV drama is non-Canadian; and 85% of our music is produced outside of Canada.

In providing the Ontario Arts Council with the largest single increase to its funding in history, we are saying that our culture is not expendable and not negotiable. It is not for sale.

C'est à nous de publier nos écrivains, de produire nos propres films, de mettre en scène notre danse et notre théâtre, d'exposer et de mettre en valeur nos artistes visuels. C'est à nous de soutenir les travailleurs et les industries qui créent et protègent notre riche culture unique et irremplaçable.

It is up to us to publish our writers, to produce our own films, to stage our own dance and theatre, to exhibit and appreciate our own visual artists. It is up to us to support the workers and the industries that create and protect our own unique and irreplaceable culture.

RESPONSES

OMA AGREEMENT

Mr Phillips: I am pleased to respond to the statement by the Minister of Health and to indicate that we are pleased that an agreement has been reached. We very much appreciate the role that the Ontario Medical Association plays in the life of this province and are pleased, as I say, that it seems to be pleased with the settlement. I would say, though, that as we look at the document -- and I urge each member to review it because I received it, I guess, about 24 hours ago, or a little more than that -- it is an extremely important document for the future of health care in the province, and I think it deserves a fair bit of study by all of us.

Certainly there are some issues in here that I would like at least to raise now, and as we have a chance to review the agreement over time, to feel confident that I can raise questions in the House around it.

First, I think we should appreciate that there is the establishment of a major new joint management committee with some very substantial responsibilities, with 50% from the government side and 50% from the OMA. The deputy minister will be on that committee. It will meet at least monthly and will have a large number of important agenda items. Decisions will be made by that committee on the basis of votes.

I guess my first concern is as we look at the public health issues that will move from the public domain into the private domain. This committee, as I say, will have a staff, will have a budget, will meet at least monthly, and will have a 50-50 representation. We have a brand-new model for dealing with some very important health issues here. On the one hand, all of us obviously very much support the co-operation between the government and the OMA. But one thing I think we must be careful of is that major policy public-health issues do not move from the public domain to the private domain. That would be one question that I will raise now and be perhaps asking further questions on.

The second thing is about the financial side. The minister mentioned that for this fiscal year there is some certainty. My understanding, though, reading the document, is that the determination of the size of the fund -- of the pot, if you will -- can be made by the arbitrator. So the certainty, in many respects, leaves the government at that stage and goes to an independent arbitrator. That may be fine, but that independent arbitrator is making a decision on the basis of about a $5-billion pot. That, the Treasurer will know, is more money than he receives from the federal government in transfer payments. So a very major step is being taken here as we let that decision move from the government to an independent arbitrator.

The third issue that I would raise and that we may have the chance to talk about over time is just how much flexibility we have lost with this agreement in terms of looking at new ways to solve our health issues in the future.

We are very pleased that an agreement has been reached. I would say to all members, though, that they will want to pore over this agreement because it fundamentally changes the way the health care system in this province works and will work in the future. It puts enormous responsibility in the hands of this joint committee. We will want, as I say, to further understand how that will unfold.

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ARTS AND CULTURE FUNDING

Mr Henderson: This announcement of a $7.5-million funding hike to the Ontario Arts Council is a good step, but it is old, old stuff. This is not a minister's statement; it is a historical treatise. We should have asked for unanimous consent to even allow it.

Of course we welcomed the Treasurer's announcement a week ago of this funding increment. It is something that the Treasurer promised us details about; however, there are no details in this statement whatever. There are just platitudes and generalities and pillow talk.

Where are the promises that we heard about last summer? Why is the minister not telling us something about that? Why can he not be specific about what he is going to do? What about the new powers for artists on advisory boards and the imaginative new funding programs that we heard about? What about the upgrading of the arts in our school curricula, promoting of the arts in our factories and with our workers? What about the bold new funding measures for arts festivals we heard about, and what about the new tax breaks for artists and performers? What about the new programs for visiting performers and visiting artists and arts fairs? What about the expansion of the Royal Conservatory of Music and the promise of six years of free instrumental training for our children in Ontario? What about the new funding support for the Art Gallery of Ontario?

We would like to hear some real details of this funding increment. We welcome the $7.5-million increment, and the arts council certainly does deserve it. We praise what is good in what we have heard, but we want to hear much, much more.

OMA AGREEMENT

Mrs Witmer: Our party is pleased at this time that the Ontario government and the Ontario Medical Association have reached an agreement in a spirit of co-operation. This spirit of co-operation is certainly an improvement over the hostile atmosphere that prevailed when the former Liberal government negotiated with the OMA. At that time, doctors in this province staged a strike.

Unfortunately, our party has just received a copy of the agreement. We have not had an opportunity to review the agreement in detail and we are not certain as to what the total cost will be to our taxpayers. That is something that we are extremely concerned about.

We are also uncertain about the role of the joint management committee. It appears that some of the decision-making is going to be taken out of the hands of the public and become part of the private decision-making process. We certainly have some questions about that.

I think it is also important to remember that when we talk about health care costs, it is not the doctors who make up 100% of these costs. We must remember that if we are going to meet the needs of the citizens in this province, if we are going to provide the quality and effectiveness of health care to our citizens, we need to take a look at the hospitals that are running deficits, the hospitals that are closing departments, and the number of patients who are still being forced to cross the border for treatment and to go to other provinces.

We need to remember that in this last budget, there was absolutely no mention of community-based care or long-term care. I know that was very disappointing to seniors in this province and to those with disabilities who were looking forward to seeing some mention.

Therefore, although this agreement is a progressive step forward, I am still concerned, as are the members of our party, as to what the cost will be, and at what cost to the taxpayers in this province. I would ask the government to come forward at a later date with more of those details.

ARTS AND CULTURE FUNDING

Mrs Marland: In responding to the statement from the Minister of Culture and Communications, I guess what I have to say is that I do not know how many times we are supposed to jump up and congratulate this government on its reannouncements. This announcement was actually a one-line budgetary increase announced by the Treasurer last week, and here we are today up on our feet taking four pages to say what the Treasurer said in one line last week.

Frankly, I think the government has received its praise for its funding to the Ontario Arts Council. We have always supported the work of the Ontario Arts Council. We support the fact that the OAC in fact allocates the funds itself, that the money has always been given by the government to the Ontario Arts Council for its own disbursements.

However, I really have to wonder what it is that we are getting into with this new government. Are we going to get these sort of whoopee statements every day on stuff that it has already announced in the budget? Maybe it indicates that they do not have anything else to tell us. Maybe it is an indication that they are reaching so far that they have to go back and think: "Now, what is it we can announce today? Oh, yes. We'll reannounce something that we announced in the budget last week."

Quite frankly, I would have been more encouraged if this minister had made an announcement today dealing with the publishing industry support program. That is the statement and that is the announcement we are looking for. We already know from a federal government study that there are six Canadian publishing companies in the red. We would think that this government would be concerned about that. We would think that we would have more than just a sketchy outline of what that program is going to be, and we look forward to this minister telling us something in a ministerial statement that we do not already know.

ORAL QUESTIONS

ASSISTANCE TO BUSINESS

Mr Kwinter: I have a question for the Minister of Industry, Trade and Technology. Last week, the minister announced a $57-million manufacturing recovery program which is intended to provide loans and loan guarantees and possible financial assistance to hire management personnel and technical and marketing personnel. This is really to help small businesses and small manufacturers who are having difficulties. At the same time, the minister announced that he would add an additional $11 million to the Innovation Ontario budget, actually doubling it.

My question to the minister is: Since in 1991 the budget for MITT is exactly the same as it was for 1990, and since he has announced these new programs, could he please tell me where he is going to get the new additional funding to provide these programs?

Hon Mr Pilkey: There was a rearrangement of priorities within the ministry, and while it is true that the operating budget of MITT is identical to that of the previous year, when including the capital portion of the budget with the operating, the budget is in fact up 11%.

Mr Kwinter: One of the amazing transformations that happened to the Premier on his way to the Premier's office is that he admitted he had learned to add. Prior to that --

Hon Mr Rae: I've never made that admission.

Mr Kwinter: No, the Premier did. He said, on British Gas, "I can add." On 17 March, when the Premier stood up and said that he would never allow it, he obviously admitted he could not add. Notwithstanding that, the point is that on all the programs they had promised, they now say: "Well, we didn't realize the numbers. We couldn't add."

I am hoping we can have more luck with the minister. He has just announced that he is going to increase his budget by 11%. Is that correct? I take it that it is. If he could just add and if he could calculate, he has announced $57 million for the manufacturing program, the recovery program. He has announced $11 million for the Innovation Ontario program. There is a flat line on the budget which represents a 5% decline. In total, the amount of money that is being utilized for this program is 40% of the MITT budget.

The Speaker: Could we have a question.

Mr Kwinter: Even giving him the benefit of the doubt on the 11%, where is the rest of that money going to come from?

Hon Mr Pilkey: The information I conveyed to the member for Wilson Heights is correct. I did indicate to him that his calculations, in so far as they went in comparing this year's operating costs to last year's, were in fact identical, and there was an 11% increase when one combines the capital expenditures.

There was, within the budget, a realignment of priorities, which I think is typical of all budgets from year to year. As well, the financing for many of the programs is on a multi-year basis because the takeup will be over a successive number of years. That perhaps is an explanation as to why the member cannot quite come to terms with the exact figures: there is a takeup, it is on a phased basis, the program is multi-year and it will be financed on a multi-year basis.

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Mr Kwinter: I just want to quote -- this is an added little benefit that I received, because I did not expect the minister to say that. In effect, if I can only find it in here, there is a specific provision that all of these funds must be taken up. Here it is. Sorry; I just found it. It says: "Interested companies are encouraged to contact my ministry's small business hot line. All applications must be made prior to the end of the current fiscal year."

The point I am trying to make is that notwithstanding the minister's 11%, even though he had his 11%, there is a 30% discrepancy. There is 30% that he has not accounted for. We have all of the programs he has announced; they are already at the ministry. There is nothing new at all. The point is that the minister is playing games, and I would like to know what programs he is going to discontinue when we have all of these serious problems affecting Canadian industry. What 30% of his budget is going to disappear? Could he answer that question, please.

Hon Mr Pilkey: There is no attempt to play any games with respect to the budget. These new programs actually are new initiatives that were fed into the budget process. That is not to deny, that is to admit as well, that there were certain restrictions placed on the normal operating budget of not only our ministry but in fact of all ministries.

The question as to why the member cannot seem to add all the numbers up and make them come out to where he thinks they should is simply because the applications are closed off, but the take up and the development of the program may span one, two or three years. Management Board sets the method of financing of when these allocations will come forward. That is why the budgeted amounts are spread over that particular time and not shown in the very same year in which it was allocated and announced.

HUNTING AND FISHING IN ALGONQUIN PARK

Mr Scott: My question is not for the Solicitor General, who I see still proposes to cling to the wreckage of his portfolio for a day or two longer; it is rather a question for the Minister of Natural Resources.

The minister will know that under the leniency guidelines which have been in effect under the previous two governments and, I believe, in a slightly modified form in this one, it has been the practice to lay charges under the Game and Fish Act in cases where the take is beyond the needs of personal consumption and then to apply the leniency guidelines following that, so that the public knows that a charge has been laid; then it is withdrawn and the public knows an act of leniency has taken place. This practice has been followed by both preceding governments and I believe by this one. The minister will be aware of a large investigation at Cape Croker in which there was evidence that some six tons of fish were taken. We have been told, and there has been, I gather, a leak to the Toronto Star from some loyal servant of the minister's, that the deputy minister intervened to stop this process before the charges were even laid, rather than using the leniency principle.

I want to ask the minister, does he condone this type of interference in the laying of charges by the deputy minister? How often has the deputy minister acted as a judge on these issues before charges have been laid? Was the minister involved himself in the decision-making process which short-circuited this investigation?

Hon Mr Wildman: The member will know, since he has referred to the leniency guidelines that have been in effect since 1979, the process is that in cases where commercialization is suspected and/or special investigations are deemed necessary, prior to the instigation of such an investigation the deputy minister and senior staff review the need for such an investigation before authorizing it. Then, after the investigation is complete and evidence is collected, the investigating officer refers that evidence to the deputy minister and the senior staff for review to determine whether or not evidence indicates charges should be laid.

I do not have any personal involvement in or knowledge of the particular case that the member refers to, and I want to assure him that the decision was made by the deputy minister and his senior staff in whom I have the fullest of confidence.

Mr Scott: The reality is, apart altogether from a preinvestigation situation -- which this is not, because the investigation was largely completed at a cost of $140,000 -- the practice is to lay the charge and then to apply the leniency guidelines so that the public will know, for better or for worse, exactly what is happening.

The Sparrow case says that personal consumption is the test. The minister accepts that. That has always been the leniency guideline. In this case what was proposed to be consumed was six tons of fish. It clearly cannot meet the personal consumption test.

I want to ask the minister -- I presume he will accept responsibility for his department and for his agents, even if the Solicitor General continues not to -- what he is going to do to interview the deputy minister to determine the circumstances that happened. We have six tons of fish going bad. We have an investigation that took $140,000. We have the decision made not to lay charges, in which the minister played no part. What I want to ask is, has he changed his policy? If not, is he going to apply the --

The Speaker: Would the member take his seat, please.

Hon Mr Wildman: The member is fully aware that the policy, in terms of how the policy is applied, has not changed. It is the similar policy that has been in effect since 1979. The member will also be aware that the decision with regard to the laying of charges has been subject to review by the deputy minister and his senior staff, as has been the case in the past.

He also will be aware that since the Sparrow decision the government has instituted consultations with aboriginal organizations and with many groups, such as the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters, the Federation of Ontario Naturalists, the World Wildlife Fund Canada and others, about a new enforcement regime that will be an interim regime while we negotiate the agreements that will ensure that the aboriginal right recognized by the Sparrow decision is able to be exercised while conservation and public safety are protected. That is the situation we are in. That is the situation as it has been stated in the House. Nothing has changed.

Mr Scott: The minister surely cannot pretend that nothing has changed. The guidelines and the Sparrow case say that charges will be laid unless the fish or moose or whatever is taken is sufficient only for personal consumption. What we are talking about here is six tons of fish. It would take a lot of Fridays to eat six tons of fish, even for a Catholic like me.

What I want to say to my honourable friend is, when will he face up to it? Have the guidelines been changed, or has the deputy taken a step that is not consistent with the guidelines? While we are at it, as a supplementary, having aborted this investigation, the OPP have now, I understand, been called in to pull out all stops to find out who leaked this information to the Toronto Star about the whole affair. What I want to know is, what happened after all to this government, which was going to allow whistle-blowers full freedom, even in the Ministry of Natural Resources?

Hon Mr Wildman: Is this multiple choice after the five questions that were asked? I think it is not appropriate for a member of this House to stand here and attack the integrity of a public servant such as the deputy minister. I would say that since the Sparrow decision it is incumbent upon all legislators, not only in Ontario but across Canada, to reflect on the aboriginal right to consume fish and game for food and for community use or ceremonial purposes, and on the responsibility of the government to protect conservation and public safety. It is most unfortunate to attempt to make political games out of such a sensitive issue.

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TAXATION

Mr Stockwell: To the Premier: The response from his gas guzzler tax has been very clear and it has come from all angles, all walks of life, including union presidents. I quote from Ron Davis, Local 199 president, saying that, "I'm in favour of reducing emissions, but I don't know if that is really the way to attack the problem." The chairman of Ford, Ken Harrigan, has said, "It will unquestionably cause job layoffs in St Thomas and Windsor," the gas guzzler tax that the government has put forward.

Considering the fact that the response from both management and union has been the same, what does he suggest he tell these auto workers, or we tell these auto workers when we come across them, that his government has just changed the word from "green" to "greed," and that they lose their job because of it?

Hon Mr Rae: I am going to let the Treasurer answer that question.

Hon Mr Laughren: I should say to the member for Etobicoke West that I certainly understand that people who are involved in jobs in which either the engines for these vehicles are produced or the vehicles themselves are being assembled are concerned about the gas guzzler tax.

I would simply remind the member that I think only about 15% of the vehicles that are covered under the gas guzzler tax are sold in this province and the rest are exported, so I think that to put it in perspective the member should understand that it is not as though every one of these vehicles or engines is sold in the province of Ontario and will be affected by the new tax in the province.

Mr Stockwell: The Chevy Lumina and the Buick Regal are in fact manufactured in Oshawa. These are directly impacted by the Treasurer's gas guzzler tax. These are going to affect jobs in this province. They are affecting jobs in Oshawa and in GM plants around this province.

The Ford Motor Co chairman, Ken Harrigan, has said that without question this gas guzzler tax is going to cost jobs for Ontario auto workers in St Thomas and Windsor. Windsor, a town ravaged by this recession, needs more job layoffs like it needs a hole in the head.

The response has been very clear. The Treasurer changing the name of this gas guzzler tax in the name of the environment is just simply changing the word "green" to "greed." It is simple greed and a tax ripoff that is costing people their jobs and new taxes.

The question to the Treasurer is, what does he say to those auto workers who are now going to be unemployed, who are going to lose their jobs because he cannot accept the fact that this tax is going to cost the Ontario economy dollars and jobs? What does he say to these auto workers?

Hon Mr Laughren: To be fair, the member should at least acknowledge the fact that all the models of the cars that are categorized as, for example, the Chev Lumina, are not covered by the gas guzzler tax. It is only certain models with the larger engines and less fuel economy.

Mr Stockwell: Yes, the big-selling models.

Hon Mr Laughren: No, that is not true. I understand the problem. I have received no indication of specific potential job losses from the industry and, as well, the member is completely wrong if he says that it should be called a greed tax, not a green tax.

There were three reasons for the gas guzzler tax to be increased. One was for protection of the environment, two was for energy conservation, and I would be less than candid if I did not say that it increases revenues for the province of Ontario as well.

Mr Stockwell: The Treasurer is the only person who has not heard from the auto industry, if he is suggesting that. Everyone, I believe, in this House has heard from the auto industry and everybody from the auto industry is saying that this is a bad tax.

I will take the Treasurer back to 1988; this debate was taking place in the House. Let me alert the members to what the Treasurer, the then critic in the NDP caucus, said regarding the Liberals' increases in the tax for the gas guzzlers: "simply another tax grab by the Liberals." In 1988 the Treasurer called these taxes tax grabs by the Liberals. Today he is calling them responsible environmental laws passed by his government.

All power companies have called it a bad news budget. All union locals have called it a bad news budget. The only person who supports this is the president, Bob White, and he does not speak for the union representatives who are being laid off in the car towns.

Interjections.

The Speaker: You will get your question, but I would appreciate the opportunity to hear the question.

Mr Stockwell: The question to the Treasurer is threefold. He is saying it is an environmental act; back in 1988 he called it a tax grab. It is more revenue; there is no question about that. He is suggesting he is not hearing from the auto workers and the chairmen of certain boards, from GM to Ford.

The Speaker: And the question?

Mr Stockwell: Why does the Treasurer not give them the opportunity of giving him input? Why does he not go to the car towns and have public hearings and hear from the workers, hear from the people who are affected most by this? If the government is open and accessible, it will agree to it. If it is not, it will not agree to it. I would like to hear the Treasurer's comments to that.

Hon Mr Laughren: First of all, to correct what the member said, I did not say I had never heard from the industry at all. I know there was a lot of noise when I was responding, but what I said was, I had not received any information on specific job losses concerning the gas guzzler tax.

As far as my comments in 1988 are concerned, I think fairminded observers would agree that in 1988, when the economy was booming, there were a lot more alternatives and options for raising revenues than there are today, and I think the public out there expects us to pass laws and to pass taxes that will both conserve energy and enhance the environment.

BUDGET

Mr Harris: My question is of the Premier. I would like to remind the Premier of his words on 20 November in the throne speech. At that time he said, "This is a government that will listen to the people and respond to their needs to the best of its ability."

I have heard from the people. Their response on his budgetary policy is loud and clear -- they believe he is proceeding 180 degrees in the wrong direction. They are angry, they are not going to take it any more. Why is the Premier so opposed to my call to hold full public hearings on this budget before proceeding further?

Hon Mr Rae: I do not pretend that I have any pipeline to the people, any more than the leader of the third party does. I can only tell him that perhaps he and I have been talking to different people.

My sense is that the people of the province understand that we are in a recession. They understand that this is precisely the time when governments need to reach out and do something for people. That is precisely what we are trying to do as a government, and I would say to the honourable member that if they have to choose between the policies that we are advocating and the policies that are being advocated by his federal cousins which have contributed so directly to the mess that we now find ourselves in, I still believe the people would prefer the option which we are presenting to them in this budget. I really believe that.

That notwithstanding, let me say to the honourable member --

The Speaker: Quickly, please.

Hon Mr Rae: -- that in the normal course of events in this House, the budget bills will go out to committee. They will be discussed in committee. If the member wants to have a discussion about any aspect of our budgetary policy with respect to what we are doing, it is there. There is a budget debate in the House, which is a full opportunity for people to discuss; the estimates process, which will begin very soon. I think people would rather do that than to see somebody ring bells and --

The Speaker: Premier, take your seat, please.

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Mr Harris: The Premier will know that if we follow that policy, it will all culminate about five days before Christmas, after the budget has already been implemented, after he has collected the taxes for six or seven months, after he has started down this path to destroy the economy of this province.

Here is what the Premier said, and I will read it to him one more time.

Interjections.

The Speaker: The leader of the third party, just a moment. The leader, like all members, has a right to be heard uninterrupted. We are back, as we so frequently find ourselves, in a scenario where we hear questions we do not like and we hear responses we do not like. It is a difficult aspect of parliamentary life, I realize. Perhaps we could allow the leader of the third party to place his question.

Mr Harris: The Premier said on 20 November, "This is a government that will listen to the people to the best of its ability." That is what he said.

Seventy-five per cent of the eligible voters in this province did not vote for his government. He does not have a mandate to destroy this province's economy. He has pursued a disastrous course that is clearly 180 degrees in a different direction from what the people felt he stood for, listening to all his comments through the campaign and before. Why is he so opposed to letting the public come before a legislative committee and tell him what they think of this budgetary direction? Why is he opposed to hearing from the public before he starts down this track that they are so opposed to?

Hon Mr Rae: If the budget bills are referred out, we are delighted to have a discussion with respect to what is going on.

I just got a copy of the press release put out by the PC party, in which the leader of the third party alleges, "The New Democrats tried to silence us last week." The only people who tried to silence anybody were the people who were ringing bells. They silenced themselves. We are ready to debate the budget any time he wants to debate the budget, anywhere, any place. He should name the place. Why not do it right here?

Mr Harris: The Premier wants the debate to proceed without hearing from the public. We know where he stands on the budget; he drafted the stupid thing. People know where I stand on the budget; I am not going to let it pass. I think they know where we stand on the budget.

What I am asking the Premier for is what he called for in opposition, what he has always said, what he said right in his throne speech: "To the best of our ability, we will listen to the people." Before he starts debating, before he asks people on all sides of the House to make up their minds, I am asking him to listen to the people. Why then will he not allow the whole budget to go out to a legislative committee so we can hear from the people before we hear the debate?

Hon Mr Rae: The leader of the third party, in a rather novel constitutional argument, says that he has no intention of letting the budget pass. I can only say to the member that we are --

Interjection.

Hon Mr Rae: The Liberals are the ones who called the election after three years; he wants to have one after seven months.

Under the constitutional rules of the House, it seems to me that the leader of the third party is certainly entitled to express himself in any way he chooses, but I can only say to him that we have brought in a budget which reflects the situation that we are in, which is a very serious recession. We have charted a path with respect to the future that we are prepared to debate in this House at any time. We are more than happy to have the bills referred out to committee and have them fully discussed in committee. In the normal course of events, we will have an estimates process. Why would the leader of the Conservative Party deny the New Democratic Party what every other government in the history of the province has been able to do?

OMA AGREEMENT

Mr Phillips: I would like to direct a question to the Minister of Health. It has to do, of course, with the agreement that she announced today between the Ontario Medical Association and the government. The agreement contains the establishment of quite a senior level joint management committee that will be operating with the deputy and a senior person of OMA and equal representation on each side.

It is certain in reading the document that this committee is going to have a very large input into the health care system in the province in the future. The mechanisms that are set up, as the minister knows, call for a structure in voting that requires both sides to agree on matters before action can be taken. How does the minister respond to people who say that the structure of this committee does hand over, some say excessive, but certainly a very large amount of power and responsibility in the determination of public health policy to a non-elected group, albeit of high-calibre people, that is operating really behind closed doors in a manner that will take an awful lot of the public policy issues and see them decided, in a sense, in a bargaining environment between two parties?

Hon Ms Lankin: This is a very new and, we believe, innovative relationship that we are establishing in this province between the medical profession and the government, moving towards a joint management of the health care system but not unilaterally just the government and the medical profession. We believe that there needs to be involvement of other health care professionals and there needs to be involvement and dialogue with the consumers as well.

The composition of the joint management committee will allow for us on the government side to involve others in that process, and we fully intend to make use of that opportunity. Additionally, with respect to the issues that the joint management committee will be dealing with and developing its action plans on, those are issues that can be brought forward by the physicians and by the government. It is our hope that together, collaboratively in a partnership, we will actually develop better-working plans. But in areas where there is not a clear answer or where there is not a clear implementation plan, the government will have to continue to manage and will have to continue to develop health care policy in the broadest sense of consultation with consumers and other health care providers.

Mr Phillips: The minister partially answered it, but one of the lines in the document that caught my attention says, "The Ontario Medical Association has assumed important public responsibility in the joint management of all medical services and all issues related to the health care system of Ontario." "Joint" was, I thought, an important word there, and "all medical services and all issues related to the health care system." As I said in my remarks earlier, I am pleased that agreement has been reached, but that is quite a broad statement that, at least for other people in the health care professions, raises questions of whether there is a two-tiered involvement: the doctors and then all others.

The minister, in her response to my first question, suggested that she is prepared to consider involvement by other professions. I wonder if she is prepared to consider that in some formal mechanism. I realize she said they could be part of the government side, I gather, of the joint management committee, but is she prepared to look at similar models for other professions that might have a similar input into the health care issues in the province?

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Hon Ms Lankin: There are many models already of joint bodies and bodies that involve consumers and other health care professionals that will be looking at issues around scope of practice, issues around policy with their professions.

With respect to this particular joint management committee, as we indicate in the agreement, there will be issues of joint concern, brought forward either by physicians or by the government, that will be dealt with. Let me give an example of some of those issues so that it might be clear, although we do not intend at all to exclude the input of other health care professionals, why we want to start off with this joint committee and this joint structure under this agreement.

For example, the system of management that we are putting in place is one that relies on our being able to have a utilization formula that will actually keep us within a limit, within a budget, within a pool of money set aside for doctors, billings. That utilization formula, in order for it not just to be arbitrary and unilateral, will require the cooperation of both parties to work on things like the growth in number of physicians and where physicians practice. We have a problem in this province with respect to rural medicine.

Action plans around those sorts of issues will be addressed by this joint management committee, and I think I would say as an old negotiator that when you look at a negotiated deal from a negotiator's point of view you usually look for a win-win situation. I think here in this one we have a win-win-win situation.

The Speaker: Would you conclude your remarks, please.

Hon Ms Lankin: Just wrapping up then, we have the government of Ontario that I think wins in fiscal responsibility and better quality health care; doctors who care about the delivery of quality service and not just a revolving-door medicine will win; and the public, through both other health care professional involvement and consumer involvement, will win from both of these items.

NON-PROFIT HOUSING

Mr Tilson: My question is for the Minister of Housing. The minister will be aware of my estimate released this morning during a press conference of the potential of about $170 million in fees charged by consultants, architects, brokers and lawyers for work on this government's non-profit housing incentives if proper cost controls and accountability are not introduced.

I wonder if the minister would tell the House exactly what steps he is prepared to take to ensure that the current rate of spending on such fees and charges is brought under control and that persons providing services for these programs are paid only for the work they actually perform. Would he not agree that the Treasurer's budget promise of refining programs, speeding up approvals and reallocating units suggests only that haste might make for even further waste?

Hon Mr Cooke: First of all, I do not accept the argument that the Conservative Housing critic has made. We follow in our government, as the previous government did and as the government previous to it did and the federal government does now under the federal-provincial program, the same types of guidelines, and originally the guidelines were set by the federal government.

I understand where the Housing critic for the Conservative Party is coming from. He is coming from the point of view that the government should not be involved at all in the creation of housing in this province. Our party fundamentally disagrees with that point of view.

At a time when the economy is very poor, we decided that we were going to create the 35,000 units that are in the system now plus 10,000 more of those units. That will provide affordable housing for the people of this province and thousands of jobs for people in the building industry. That is something I am very proud of, and I am not at all defensive or going to attack that type of program as the member seems to be willing to.

Mr Tilson: Our party certainly supports non-profit housing; it is a must. However, this government clearly has no intention of saving. Surely they would be interested in saving 1% of $2 billion. All we are asking for is some controls on the proposals that they are putting forward.

Given the fact that by my calculation there are just over 22,000 Homes Now units which are neither built nor as yet under construction, would the minister confirm the fact that there are just over 22,000 Homes Now units that are not built yet? Would the minister agree with me that if that is the case, it is not too late to introduce proper cost controls that would apply to these units as well as to the 10,000 units that were referred to by the Treasurer in his budget last week?

Hon Mr Cooke: I should point out to the critic that the number that he used in the press conference today and that he has reiterated in the House, the $170 million, sure is a lot of money, but it represents about 2.4% of the cost of the program. Combined with the program that the previous government initiated, we are spending about $4 billion in housing for the people of this province, so the cost is about 2.4% of the total cost.

The critic for the Conservative Party will know that we are going to be releasing soon a consultation document on supply. If the critic for the Conservative Party has any suggestions of how cost can be further refined, I am more than willing to listen to those suggestions from the critic. But this morning when he was asked that question by the press, he could not answer it.

HUNTING AND FISHING IN ALGONQUIN PARK

Mr Drainville: I would like to address a question to the minister responsible for native affairs. As he knows, there have been a number of articles recently regarding aboriginal hunting and fishing rights, especially as regards enforcement procedures. Would the minister please inform this House of the policy of the Ministry of Natural Resources expressly regarding the enforcement process?

Hon Mr Wildman: This is an important issue, and I thank the member for Victoria-Haliburton for raising it again. The member will know, as has been indicated in this House previously, that the policy is to minimize instances of charges against aboriginal people when fishing or hunting for food for community use under the Game and Fish Act, the Fisheries Act or the Migratory Birds Convention Act.

The member will also know, as I indicated in a previous answer, that in cases where commercialization is suspected or special investigations are needed, a policy similar to the one instituted in 1979 has been continued. However, it is important to recognize that in 1986 under the previous government, the policy was changed to ensure that the deputy minister and senior staff intervened both at the beginning of the investigation and prior to the laying of charges.

Mr Drainville: The honourable minister has indicated the process, but more particularly there is no question that in some of these articles there have been allegations that the ministry and/or the minister have allowed unrestricted -- I underline unrestricted -- hunting and fishing in Algonquin Park. I wonder if the minister could comment on that. What is the present situation in Algonquin Park and what is the situation around hunting and fishing specifically?

Hon Mr Wildman: As has been indicated again previously in the House, the situation in Algonquin Park is somewhat unique because of the land claim. But in regard to the question of unrestricted hunting and fishing, that of course is completely unfounded.

The ministry is currently involved in negotiations with the Algonquins of Golden Lake for subagreements on enforcement in relation to moose hunting, deer hunting and fishing in their land claim area. These negotiations and subagreements deal with levels of harvest, seasons, methods, enforcement mechanisms, conservation, public safety, parks' values.

The moose agreement, for instance, sets forward hunting from late fall to mid-January. Areas will be excluded where tourists are frequenting the park, and there will be rules regarding the use of motorized vehicles and vessels in the park. This is not unrestricted hunting or fishing.

TAXATION

Mr Conway: I have a question to the Treasurer and it concerns his budget. If the Treasurer looks at page 7 of his budget, he will see there, as he knows well, that in this document he raised the gasoline tax by approximately 25%, he says on the ground of environmental concern.

Accepting the legitimacy of a concern around the environment, what does he say to the thousands of people who live in rural communities like Renfrew county, North Addington, North Hastings, Haliburton, those tens of thousands of Ontarians living in the rural parts of the province who on a daily basis must drive, must depend upon their half-ton truck and their automobile for their work and for their family life? What does he say to those people who will be burdened with this 25% increase in something as essential to their livelihoods and their jobs as fuel in communities where there is absolutely no alternative?

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Hon Mr Laughren: I think that we live in an era, other than in major metropolitan centres where there is easy access to public transit, where virtually everybody in the province requires some kind of transportation requiring the consumption of fuel. I understand that. As a member from northern Ontario representing a riding that is very large, I appreciate the sentiments of some people about the tax increase as well. I was in my constituency on the weekend and heard the views of my own constituents in this regard.

I would simply say to those people about whom the member is concerned that it is one of those taxes that we feel will accomplish a couple of things. I have said this before. It will make a contribution, we think, to energy conservation. We think as well, and I would not pretend otherwise, that it contributes to the coffers of the province to help us deliver important social programs which those same people who pay the taxes require, whether it is education or health care or whatever.

The Speaker: Would the minister conclude his remarks, please.

Hon Mr Laughren: I would also just remind the member about the tax increases in gasoline that while 1.7 and 1.7 are a substantial increase, it was not as high as the tax increase imposed by the government in Quebec.

Mr Conway: On page 8 of the budget, I know my constituents would be very impressed to see that there was some relief -- I think appropriate relief -- under the guise of the Let's Move initiative to further support the good works of the Toronto Transit Commission. But I repeat, in communities like Denbigh and Killaloe and Shining Tree, there is no TTC. There is absolutely no alternative to the half-ton truck and the automobile for livelihood and for family life.

Two-part supplementary: Will the Treasurer contemplate some relief to people living in rural communities all across Ontario in light of this situation where they have no alternative and where this 25% increase in an essential service like fuel is going to be very burdensome? Would he comment that perhaps he has changed his opinion in this Legislature since that day in December 1988 when, speaking to a gasoline tax increase brought about by a previous government, he said, "Any politician who would seriously argue that there was an environmental ingredient in a gasoline tax hike was misleading the Legislature with hogwash"?

Hon Mr Laughren: I am going to have to check the record because I find it hard to believe I said that.

However, I would say to the member in a serious way that if I had considered relief to people in border communities, to people in northern Ontario, to people in rural communities, to people in eastern Ontario, it would have eroded the whole tax base of the fuel tax system to a degree that was unacceptable to me. I think before we pass judgement simply in opposition to taxes we should think very seriously about the services that those taxes help us deliver.

Mr Cousens: In the absence of the Minister of the Environment, I have a question for the Premier. He had not indicated that he was leaving. We sent a note across indicating the question. Is the Premier coming back or has he gone?

Hon Mr Laughren: He is long gone.

Mr Cousens: Is he not coming back to answer the question? I know the anger that he used to show when someone would leave. I will not show that anger. I will try the acting Deputy Premier who will now become the environment person for the province.

Interjection.

Mr Cousens: It is not impossible.

Mr Scott: Why carry on question period if the person you want to ask is not here?

Mr Cousens: That is what bothers me. We come here to try to get some answers in question period --

The Speaker: Could we now have the question?

Mr Cousens: -- and it is just impossible. We just start to talk -- I do not know what --

The Speaker: The member for Markham, if he would like to place a question, may do so to the Deputy Premier.

Mr Cousens: I will ask the Treasurer and Minister of Economics. In last week's budget, he indicated that the government is going to increase fuel taxes for cars and trucks and tractors, planes and trains. He has also added a gas guzzler tax that hits small cars, cars that you would normally buy to be very economical. He even has the Prelude in there. He has added the gas tax and he has added the gas guzzler tax, which is a huge increase in taxes, all in the name of conservation and a better environment. Could the Treasurer tell this House what percentage of these revenues that he is raising in the name of the environment will go into the Ministry of the Environment?

Hon Mr Laughren: I think the member understands that we do not in this province have a system of designated taxes, although I hasten to add that I do think that is something that we should take a serious look at.

Mrs Cunningham: That is what you used to say over here.

Hon Mr Laughren: I did say that. That is correct. I said that we should --

Mrs Cunningham: A little bit consistent here for a change.

Hon Mr Laughren: I will talk to you, Mr Speaker.

The Speaker: That is the way it works.

Hon Mr Laughren: It is something that we should seriously consider, although I do not want to make a commitment. I have always felt that governments impose taxes, collect the taxes and disburse the tax revenues and then live or die by the priorities they establish in the way in which they allocate those revenues. I think that there are a couple of areas where we should at least consider the allocation of taxes, but I hasten to add that absolutely no decision has been made in that regard at this point.

Mr Cousens: What a change. I cannot believe this person standing up, from what he was before to what he is now. Now he is going to think about it. I do not know what he is going to do. The fact of the matter is they are raising a heap of money in the name of the environment and I want to know, and this side of the House wants to know, and so do the people out there want to know, how much money is going to go into the environmental pot. He has collected about $150 million or more on the tire tax and it just sits there not being used to help any of the initiatives going on. He has announced $28 million toward the 3Rs. We know there is that little bit happening, but as for really putting money into a comprehensive, organized plan of the Ministry of the Environment so that we can begin to deal with environmental issues, that is what we want to know. How much money is he going to allocate towards the Ministry of the Environment that comes out of all the money he is collecting in the name of the environment?

Hon Mr Laughren: I might say two things in response to the member: First is that the estimates from the various ministries will be tabled tomorrow and there will be a breakdown and the member will get an answer, but, second, and I think more important, when a province has a Minister of the Environment who is as dedicated to the protection of the environment as this Minister of the Environment is, I am not sure you need to designate the taxes to any particular ministry.

COST OF ELECTRICAL POWER

Mrs Mathyssen: My question is not to the Solicitor General who continues to inspire the confidence of Ontarians by virtue of his conscientious hard work --

The Speaker: The question is for?

Mrs Mathyssen: -- nor is it to the Minister of Natural Resources who has shown intelligent and sensitive leadership in his efforts to bring fairness to the government interaction with aboriginal people, but rather it is to the Minister of Energy.

Last Friday, Energy Probe released a statement claiming that Ontario Hydro was providing a discount rate to large industrial consumers of 2.4 cents per kilowatt-hour. Is Ontario Hydro providing these kinds of discounts for big power users?

Hon Ms Carter: I want to thank my colleague for giving me this opportunity to clear up a misunderstanding. The overall average cost of power for large industrial customers in Ontario is not 2.4 cents per kilowatt-hour, as Energy Probe claims. It was 4.1 cents per kilowatt hour in 1990 and the corresponding number in 1991 will be about 4.4 cents a kilowatt-hour.

All rates offered by Ontario Hydro are published rates. All rates for industrial customers have been examined in detail by the Ontario Energy Board and none offers power below the cost of production. Energy Probe's calculation is based on a statement made by the lawyer for the Association of Major Power Consumers in Ontario at the demand-supply plan hearing. He stated that AMPCO members purchase approximately 21% of the electricity that Hydro produces --

The Speaker: Would the minister conclude her remarks, please?

Hon Ms Carter: -- at a cost of roughly $600 million per year. These figures are in error. They are based on data that are out of date by six or seven years.

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LONG-TERM CARE

Mrs McLeod: My question is for the Minister of Community and Social Services. We were rather surprised to note today on the minister's public agenda, which came out as a news release, that later this afternoon she will be attending a meeting of the policy and priorities board of cabinet in order to discuss long-term care. The reason that we were surprised is because, as everyone in the House will be well aware, there was absolutely no mention of long-term care in the budget release last week and no indication of any ongoing commitment on the part of this government to long-term care reform.

The minister may not understand the level of concern that has created among representatives of seniors and of the disabled people across this community. They have been waiting with a great deal of anxiety to know what this government plans to do with long-term care, and to this point they have heard nothing.

These people need to know what the government's intents are. I would ask the minister whether she can tell us if specific proposals are being taken forward to policy and priorities board this afternoon and what those policies are or whether this is simply going to be an extension of the moratorium with another consultation.

Hon Ms Akande: In actual fact we have been quite busy in dealing with long-term care. It is another interministerial initiative that has been taken on by the Minister of Health and the Minister of Citizenship, who is also responsible for senior citizens, affairs, and myself. We have in fact very quickly, after being appointed, taken the document Strategies for Change, taken those responses to that, looked at it and decided on some alterations, some differences and some ways in which we thought the system might operate better.

We are in fact designing -- and have practically completed that design -- a consultation paper which would allow for the people out there to have an opportunity to respond to what it is that we will be applying. The previous government did go out with its paper. It was not a consultation; it was information sessions. I was a part of it.

Mrs McLeod: I am sure the minister is aware that there is not a lot of point in carrying on a consultation about reform if in fact there is no real support to be forthcoming from this government, which raises the issue of any funding commitment for long-term care in the province over the next year.

We were informed by Treasury officials during the budget lockup last week that there is an increase of $102 million in this budget for long-term care. Is any of the $102 million new money? If it is, why was there no reference to it in the budget? If it is not new money, what is the purpose in proceeding with the consultation about reform?

Hon Ms Akande: Let me answer the second part of the question first, because it leads more naturally into the response. The purpose of proceeding with the consultation is that one of the things that was very, very much emphasized to us is that people felt strongly that they should have a say in the system that was going to affect their lives, that service providers also felt extremely strongly about the service system they were going to contribute to and that in fact the information sessions that had been held by the previous government did not allow for real consultation in order for people to make those views known. Therefore, we have decided to take that, plus the changes, to the public. The financial means to monitor and to take it through that consultation are definitely there.

MINISTERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY

Mr Harris: I have a question to the Minister of Community and Social Services. I would like to read her a quote from her newsletter to St Andrews-St Patrick, paid for by the taxpayers. She said, "We,ll make mistakes, but we'll admit them."

This is good rhetoric. This is exactly what the public is looking for in political leadership. They are looking for human beings. They are looking for people who do not pretend they are above them. I think it is something that is important, something I have talked about for a great deal of time.

I wonder if, to show us this is not just rhetoric, she would tell us some of the mistakes she has made.

Hon Ms Akande: I really do appreciate the opportunity to use this House as a confessional, but I would rather not.

Mr Harris: The question is quite simple. She is the Minister of Community and Social Services. She has been there now for some seven months. If this is not just rhetoric, could she tell us some of the mistakes she has made?

Hon Ms Akande: My attention, like the attention of my colleagues, has been far too focused in addressing the needs of the people in this province, on responding to the needs that they have and making appropriate recommendations. That is where I have spent my time.

Mr Speaker: Unhappily or otherwise, the time for oral questions has expired.

WRITTEN QUESTIONS

Mr Cousens: Mr Speaker, I rise on a point of order under standing order 95(d). On 22 November I tabled an Orders and Notices paper question, number 55, in the House, which reads as follows: "Would the Minister of Citizenship list the three travel agencies with which the ministry placed the greatest portion of its travel business for fiscal years 1987-88, 1988-89, 1989-90 and the year to date."

Standing order 95(d) states, "The minister shall answer such written questions within 14 calendar days unless he or she indicates that more time is required because the answer will be costly or time-consuming or that he or she declines to answer, in which case a notation shall be made on the Orders and Notices paper following the question indicating that the minister has made an interim answer, the approximate date that the information will be available, or that the minister has declined to answer, as the case may be."

The order paper questions are supposed to be answered within 14 days, yet it has been almost four months since I tabled the question and we have as yet been told only that we would receive the answer on or about 15 April 1991. We have now passed that date and we are now in a position to begin to question whether or not this government has any intention of answering the question that has been placed on that order paper.

I see this as a reflection of the government's response to myself. It is an important question, because with that information we will be able to look at the former deputy minister, what he has been doing and various other matters.

I would hope, Mr Speaker, there would be something that you can do to take the necessary steps to enforce the standing orders of the Legislative Assembly of the province of Ontario.

The Speaker: The member for Markham will be no doubt pleased to know that he has a valid point of order. He may be even more pleased, of course, if the minister, who has heard these remarks, will be able to comply with the standing orders as quickly as possible.

Mr J. Wilson: I too have an important point of order regarding responses to order paper questions. On 22 November I tabled an Orders and Notices paper. It was number 341 and it reads, "Would the Minister of Tourism and Recreation provide the Strategic Plan for the ministry for each of the past five years, as well as the Strategic Forecast for 1991."

It was tabled, as I said, on 22 November 1990. An interim answer was tabled on 13 December 1990. It said that the information would be available on 28 December and so far I have not heard or seen any response to that order paper question.

Under standing order 95(d), it states:

"The minister shall answer such written questions within 14 calendar days unless he or she indicates that more time is required because the answer will be costly or time-consuming or that he or she declines to answer, in which case a notation shall be made on the Orders and Notices paper following the question indicating that the minister has made an interim answer, the approximate date that the information will be available, or that the minister has declined to answer, as the case may be."

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I am wondering, on my point of order here today, whether the minister is declining to answer, since I was supposed to have the information by 28 December. Order paper questions, as I said, are supposed to be answered within 14 days, yet it has been almost six months since I tabled this question. An interim answer was provided, as I said, on 13 December, but that has not been forthcoming. It has now been five months since the date that the information was to be made available.

The failure to answer order paper questions is also a breach of privilege under the Legislative Assembly Act, paragraph 45(1)6, which states that a breach of privilege occurs when there is a refusal to produce papers before the assembly or a committee thereof, access to information that is essential for me to do my job as a representative of the people and, more important in this case, as the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party's critic for Tourism and Recreation.

Mr Speaker, it is your responsibility to ensure that the standing orders of this assembly are complied with. The government has shown blatant disrespect for our standing orders by not answering this question, and I ask that you take the necessary steps to enforce the standing orders of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. I am a little taken aback that I would have to get up and remind you of your responsibility at this point and I ask you to take my concerns into consideration.

The Speaker: The member for Simcoe West will be similarly pleased that he has raised indeed a valid point of order. He will be even more pleased, I am sure, when the minister to whom he addressed his concerns will respond and uphold the standing orders.

Mrs Marland: On a point of order, Mr Speaker: I rise on a point of order under standing order 95(d). I would like to say that on 22 November 1990 I tabled order paper question 116, which reads as follows:

"Would the Minister of Culture and Communications list the three travel agencies with which the minister placed the greatest portion of its travel business for fiscal years 1987-88, 1988-89, 1989-90 and the year to date. November 22, 1990."

I would note at this time that there is actually a typographical error in the printed order. Under the year 1987 they have it printed as 1897. I think it would be important to have that corrected in future printings of that order paper question.

Standing order 95(d) states: "The minister shall answer such written questions within 14 calendar days unless he or she indicates that more time is required because the answer will be costly or time-consuming or that he or she declines to answer, in which case a notation shall be made on the Orders and Notices paper following the question indicating that the minister has made an interim answer, the approximate date that the information will be available, or that the minister has declined to answer, as the case may be."

Order paper questions are supposed to be answered within 14 days, yet it has now been almost six months since it was tabled. I would also like to say that an interim answer was provided on 11 December 1990, but that answer predicted that the information would be available on 26 April 1991. It has now been about 15 days since that date that the information would be made available.

The failure to answer order paper questions is also a breach of privilege under the Legislative Assembly Act, paragraph 45(1)(6), which states that a breach of privilege occurs when there is a refusal to produce papers before the assembly or a committee thereof.

As a member of this assembly, I feel that I have the right to access to information that is essential for me to do my job as a representative of the people of Ontario.

Mr Speaker, it is your responsibility to ensure that the standing orders of this assembly are complied with. The government has shown blatant disrespect for our standing orders by not answering my question. I ask you to take the necessary steps to enforce the standing orders of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

The Speaker: You have indeed a valid point of order. I trust that the minister has heard the remarks you have made and will comply with the standing orders as soon as possible.

Hon Mr Cooke: On this point of order, I certainly sympathize with the members of the third party. I still have an order paper question from back in 1978 in the Davis government that has not been answered.

I would like to say that we are doing the very best we can to respond to the over 400 order paper questions that the opposition has put on the order paper. We are going to respond as quickly as we can, but the third party should understand that if we are going to answer these questions immediately, we will have to hire hundreds more civil servants at a cost of millions of dollars to the taxpayers, and we are trying to protect the public purse.

The Speaker: The member for York Mills.

Mr Cousens: Mr Speaker, on a point of order.

The Speaker: The member for York Mills, I believe, rose on a point of order.

Mr Cousens: I want to speak to this point of order.

The Speaker: To the member for Markham, I recognized the member for York Mills. He has a point of order.

Mr Turnbull: I would point out that my colleague would like to speak to that point of order, and I think you should deal with that before I bring my point of order.

Mr Cousens: As deputy House leader as well, I appreciate the support.

I just have to go on record when you hear the statement that is made by the acting House leader of the government. The fact of the matter is that this House has a set of rules that we are living and working within. The government has accepted those rules, and now it is absolutely disregarding the rights of the members on this side of the House by not responding to the questions in the time frame that has been agreed upon in the standing orders. I therefore take the position that what the Minister of Housing has given in defence of the government is totally unacceptable.

If in fact he is trying to change the rules of this House in the middle of the game, it is wrong. We will not accept it. I take it as a very serious affront to our rights in opposition to be able to defend those rights. If he is saying that the government is not about to honour those rules now, then it is now causing us to have great second thoughts on how this House can work. We are in the process of trying to do our duty. It is obvious that they are not doing theirs.

The Speaker: The point of order was raised earlier. The member for York Mills, a new point of order?

Mr Turnbull: Yes. I rise on a point of order under standing order 95(d). On 22 November 1990, I tabled order paper question 253, which reads as follows:

"Inquiry of the ministry: Would the Chairman of Management Board provide copies of all reports prepared by and for the ministry on the capital and human resource costs of the government's decentralization program. November 22, 1990. Interim answer tabled 11 December 1990. Approximate date information available, 25 January 1991."

Standing order 95(d) states: "The minister shall answer such written questions within 14 calendar days unless he or she indicates that more time is required because the answer will be costly or time-consuming or that he or she declines to answer, in which case a notation shall be made on the Orders and Notices paper following the question indicating that the minister has made an interim answer, the approximate date that the information will be available, or that the minister has declined to answer, as the case may be."

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Order paper questions are supposed to be answered within 14 days, yet it has been almost four and a half months since I tabled this question. An interim answer was provided on 11 December 1990, but that answer predicted that the information would be available on 25 January 1991. It has now been approximately three and a half months since the date that information was to be made available.

The failure to answer order paper questions is also a breach of privilege under the Legislative Assembly Act 45(1)6 which states that a breach of privilege occurs when there is a refusal to produce papers before the assembly or a committee thereof.

As a member of this assembly, I feel that I have a right to access to information that is essential for me to do my job as a representative of the people of Ontario.

Mr Speaker, it is your responsibility to ensure that the standing orders of this assembly are complied with. The government has shown blatant disrespect for our standing orders by not answering the question. I ask you to take the necessary steps to enforce the standing orders of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

The Speaker: To the member for York Mills, he indeed raises a valid point of order, and no doubt his remarks have been heard by the minister affected and he should anticipate, I would hope, a speedy response to his point of order.

INTRODUCTION OF BILL

LOI ENQUÉTANT LES MOULES ZÉBRÉES / ZEBRA MUSSEL ACT

M. Harris propose la première lecture du projet de loi 95, Loi réclamant la ministre de l'Environnement de libérer ses responsabilités sous l'article 15(1) de la Loi sur les ressources en eau de l'Ontario afin de déterminer le contenu des moules zébrées du :

Mr Harris: I move that leave be given to introduce a bill entitled An Act to require the Minister of the Environment to discharge her responsibilities under section 15(1) of the Ontario Water Resources Act to determine the Zebra Mussel content of Cana Lake, Canal Bay, Canal Lake, Canard Lake, Canard River, Canary Lake, Cancer Lake, Candide Creek, Candide Lake, Candler Lake, Candybar Creek, Candybar Lake, Candy Creek, Cane Lake, Canisbay Creek, Canisbay Lake, Canis Lake, Canister Creek, Canister Lake, Can Lake, Canna Creek, Canna Lake, Cannard's Bay, Canniff Creek, Canniff Lake, Canning Lake, Cannings Falls, Cannon Creek, Cannon Lake, Canoe Bay, Canoe Bay Channel, Canoe Channel, Canoe Creek, Canoe Lake, Canoeshed Lake, Canon Creek, Canon Lake, Canonto Lake, Can Opener Lake, Canterbury Lake, Canthook Lake, Cantin Lake, Cantley Creek, Cantley Lake, Canton Lake, Cantrill Lake, Canty Lake, Canvasback Lake, Canyon Creek, Canyon Falls, Canyon Lake, Canyon River, Cap Creek, Capee Lake, Cape Harbour, Cape Hurd Channel, Capella Lake, Capin Lake, Cap Lake, Capper Lake, Capre Lake, Capreol Lake, Capricornus Lake, Capsell Lake, Captain Lake, Captains Lake, Captain Tom Lake, Capton Lake, Caput Lake, Carafel Creek, Carafel Lake, Caragana Lake, Caramat Creek Caramat Lake, Carcajou Bay, Carcajou Creek, Carcajou Lake, Carcass Lake, Card Bay, Carder Lake, Cardiff Creek, Cardiff Lake, Cardinal Creek --

Mrs Cunningham: You're going too fast. Slow down, Mike, we are trying to --

Mr Harris: Are members missing some of these in their ridings?

Mrs Cunningham: Yes, we are.

Mr Harris: All right; Cardinalis Lake, Cardinal Lake, Card Lake, Cards Lake, Cardwell Lake, Carew Lake, Carey Creek, Carey Lake, Carfrae Lake, Cargill Lake, Cargill Mill Pond, Carhess Creek, Cariad Lake, Carib Creek, Carib Lake, Cariboo Creek, Cariboo Lake, Caribou Bay, Caribou Creek, Caribou Lake, Caribou Rapids, Caribou River, Caribou Throat Lake, Caribus Lake, Carillon Rapids, Carkner Lake, Car Lake, Carl Bay, Carlbom Lake, Carl Creek, Carleton Lake, Carling Bay, Carling Lake, Carl Lake, Carlo Lake, Carlson Lake, Carlstead Bay, Carlton Lake, Carlyle Lake, Carman Bay, Carman Creek, Carman Lake, Carrnichael Lake, Carnachan Bay, Carnahan Lake, Carney Creek, Carney Lake, Carnilac Lake, Caro Lake, Caroline Lake, Carol Lake, Carolyn Creek, Caron Creek, Caron Lake, Carpenter Lake, Carpenter River, Carpet Lake, Carp Lake, Carp River, Carre Lake, Carrick Creek, Carrick Lake, Carrie Lake, Carrie Lake, Carriere Lake, Carrigan Lake, Carrington Lake, Carroll Creek, Carroll Lake, Carroll Wood Bay, Carrot Lake, Carruthers Lake, Carrying Lake, Carry Lake, Carscallen Lake, Carson Bay, Carson Creek, Carson Lake, Carss Creek, Carstens Lake, Carswell Lake, Cartan Lake, Carter Bay, Carter Lake, Carter Rapids, Carthew Bay, Cartier Lake, Cartier Creek, Cart Lake, Cartwrights Creek, Carty Creek, Carty Lake, Carver Lake, Cascade Falls, Cascade Lake, Cascaden Lake, Cascade Rapids, Cascade River, Cascanette Lake, Case River, Casey Creek, Casey Lake, Casgrain Creek, Casgrain Lake, Cash Creek, Cashel Lake, Cashman Creek, Cashore Creek, Casino Lake, Caskie Bay, Caskill Lake, Cask Lake, Casper Lake, Casque Lake, Cassdaga Lake, Casselman's Lake and Casselman's Creek, Cassels Lake, Cassidy Bay, Cassidy Creek, Cassidy Lake, Cassidys Bay, Cass Lake, Casson Lake, Castellar Creek, Castellar Lake, Castlebar Creek, Castlebar Lake, Castle Bay, Castle Creek, Castle Lake, Castleman Lake, Castlewood Creek, Castlewood Lake, Castor Creek, Castor Lake, Castoroil Lake, Castor Ponds --

Mr Johnson: On a point of order, Mr Speaker: I was wondering if the leader of the third party could slow down somewhat because the haste with which he is reading these names makes it very difficult for me assimilate them.

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The Deputy Speaker: The leader of the third party.

Mr Harris: On the point of order, I understand the member's problem. It fits in exactly with how I would have felt. He, along with his colleagues and the Treasurer, is able to assimilate information. I will try to respect his wishes and slow down.

Castor Ponds, Castor River, Castra Lake, Casurnmit Lake, Caswell Bay, Casvell Lake, Cataract Falls, Cataract Lake, Cataraqui Bay, Cataraqui River, Catastrophe Creek, Catastrophe Lake, Catawba Lake, Cat Bay, Catchacoma Lake, Catcher Lake, Cat Creek, Caterpillar Lake, Cat Falls, Catfish Bay, Catfish Creek, Catfish Lake, Catfish Rapids, Catharine Lake, Cathro Lake, Cathy's Lake, Catlonite Creek, Catlonite Lake, Cat River, Cat Tail River, Cattral Lake, Cauchon Creek, Cauchon Lake, Caulfield Lake, Cauley Lake, Cauliflower Creek, Cauliflower Lake, Caulkin Lake, Caution Lake, Cavalary Creek, Cavalary Lake, Cavanagh Lake, Cavan Creek, Cavano Lake, Cave Harbour, Cave Lake, Cavell Creek, Cavell Lake, Cavendish Lake, Caverly's Bay, Cavern Creek, Cavern Lake, Cavers Bay, Cavern Creek, Cavern Lake, Cavers Creek, Cavers Lake, Caviar Lake, Cawanogami Lake, Cawdron Creek, Cawdron Lake, Cawing Lake, Cawston Lakes, Cawthra Creek, Caya's Lake, Cayer Creek, Cayer Lake, Cayiens Creek, Caysee Lake, Cayuga Creek, Cayuga Lake, Cebush Lake, Cecebe Lake, Cecil Creek, Cecile Lake, Cedar Bay, Cedarbough Lake, Cedarclump Lake, Cedar Creek, Cedar Falls, Cedargum Lake, Cedar Harbour, Cedar Lake, Cedar Rapids, Cedar River, Cedarskirt Lake, Cedric Lake, Cee Creek.

Interjection.

Mr Harris: If members are having difficulty with pronunciation, when I do them in French it might be clearer.

Then we have Ceepee Lake.

Mr Mammoliti: On a point of order, Mr Speaker: I am speaking not only for the government but I think I am speaking for the public out there. What the third party is doing is absolutely ridiculous.

Interjections.

The Deputy Speaker: Order, please. On your point of order.

Mr Mammoliti: As I was saying before I was rudely interrupted, the third party is being ridiculous. The stalling tactics have to stop. This is a prime example of why they have not been in government for the longest time. People are sick and tired of it. People are swamping my office with phone calls.

The Deputy Speaker: Take your seat. This is not a point of order. Do you have a point of order?

Mr Jackson: On a point of order, Mr Speaker: I do believe, though, that the member for Yorkview is expressing concern because he is currently under investigation by the standing committee on administration of justice. I would assume he would prefer to be in the justice committee this afternoon discussing his conflict-of-interest allegations. That is of interest to many citizens in this province and yet he would --

The Deputy Speaker: Order. There is no point in keeping a debate this way. We all know that.

The leader of the third party is introducing a bill. Procedure dictates to us that we have to listen to his introduction of bills.

Mr Harris: I am sorry the member for Yorkview was not able to get a free apartment at taxpayers' expense, but if that bothers him, what the heck.

If I could carry on: Ceepee Lake, Celastruc Lake, Cellist Lake, Celt Creek, Celtis Lake, Celt Lake, Cemetery Creek, Cemetery Lake, Centennial Lake, Centralis Creek, Centralis Lake, Central Lake, Centre Channel, Centre Creek, Centre Falls, Centrefire Creek, Centrefire Lake, Centre Lake, Centreville Creek, Ceph Lake, Ceres Lake, Cerulean Lake, Cerullo Lake, Chabbie Lake, Chabbie River, Chabot Lake, Chadwick Lake, Chagma Lake, Chagnon Lake, Chaillon Lake, Chain Creek, Chain Lake, Chain Lakes, The Chain of Lakes, Chainy Creek, Chainy Lake, Chair Lake; Chalet Creek, Chalet Lake, Chalice Lake, Chalk Bay, Chalk Creek, Chalkend Lake, Chalk Lake, Chalk River, Challener Lake, Challener River, Challis Lake, Chalmers Lake, Chamandy Lake, Chamberlain Lake, Chamber Lake, Chambers Lake, Champagne Lake, Champlain Creek, Champlain Trail Lakes, Chance Lake, Chancellor Lake, Chandos Lake, Change Lake, Chanley Lake, Channel Lake, Channel Lakes; Green River, Greenrod Lake, Greens Bay, Green's Creek, Greenshields Lake, Greenshore Lake, Greensides Lake, Greens Lake, Greenstone Rapids, Greensward Lake, Green Tree Lake, Greenwater Creek, Greenwater Lake, Greenwich Creek, Greenwich Lake, Greenwood Lake, Greenwood River, Greer Creek, Greer Lake, Greers Bay, Greggio Lake, Greggs Lake, Gregory Bay, Gregory Creek, Gregory Lake, Grehan Lake, Greig Lake, Gremm Lake, Grenadier Creek, Grenadier Lake, Grenadier Pond, Grenfell Lake, Grenier Lake, Grenville Lake, Greske Lake, Greta Lake, Gretchel Creek, Gretchel Lake, Gretel Creek, Gretel Lake, Grew Lake, Grew River, Grey Duck Lake, Grey Lake, Grelava Lake, Grey Owl Bay, Grey Owl Lake, Green Creek, Greengrass Lake, Greenheart Creek, Greenheart Lake, Greenhedge Lake, Greenhill Lake, Greenhill Rapids, Greenhill River, Greenhorn Bay, Greenhue Lake, Greening Lake, Greening's Bay, Greenish Creek, Greenish Lake, Green Island Bay, Green Island Lake, Green Lake, Green Lakes, Greenland Lake, Greenlaw Lake, Greenleaf Creek, Greenleaf Lake, Greenlee Lake, Greenmantle Lake, Greenmantle River, Greenock Creek, Greenock Lake, Greenough Harbour, Greenpike Lake, Gravel Lake, Gravel Lakes, Gravelly Bay, Gravelpit Lake, Gravel Pit Pond, Gravelridge Lake, Gravel River, Gravenor Lake, Graves Lake, Graveyard Creek, Graveyard Lake, Graveyard Rapids, Gravy Lake, Grawbarger Lake, Grawbarger's Rapids, Graydarl Lake, Graydon Lake, Gray Lake, Grayling Lake, Graymud Lake, Gray Rapids, Grays Bay, Grays Creek, Grays Lake, Grayson Lake, Grayson River, Grays River, Graystone Lake, Graytrout Lake, Grazing Lake, Grazing River, Great Lake, Great Mountain Lake, Great North Bay, Great Portage Lake, Great South Bay, Grebe Lake, Greb Lake, Green Bay, Greenbough Lake, Green Bug Lake, Greenbush Lake, Green Creek, Grants Lake, Granzies Lake, Grape Lake, Graphic Creek, Graphic Lake, Graphite Lake, Grapnel Bay, Grapnel Creek, Grapnel Lake, Grasett Lake, Grass Creek, Grasser Lake, Grass Hill Lake, Grass Lake, Grassy Bay, Grassy Creek, Grassy Lake, Grassy Portage Bay, Grassy River, Gratton Creek, Gratton Lake, Grave Bay, Grave Creek, Grave Lake, Gravel Bay, Gravel Beach Lake, Gravel Falls, Graham Bay, Graham Creek, Graham Lake, Graharns Creek, Graharn's Lake, Granary Creek, Granary Lake, Grand Bay, Grand Campment Bay, Grande Lake, Grandeur Lake, Grand Lake, Grandmaison Lake, Grandma Lake, Grandma Stevens Pond, Grandolph Bay, Grandpa Lake, Grandpop's Lake, Grand Rapids, Grand River, Grandview Lake, Granite Bay, Graniteboss Lake, Granite Creek, Granite Falls, Granitehill Lake, Granite Lake, Granite River, Granitic Lake, Granka Lake, Granny Bay, Granny's Creek, Grano Lake, Grant Bay, Grant Creek, Grant Lake, Grant Point Harbour, Grants Creek, Grants Creek Bay, Gosselin Creek, Gosselin Lake, Gosselin's Bay, Goss Lake, Goudreau Creek, Goudreau Lake, Goudy Creek, Goudy Lake, Gough Creek, Gough Lake, Gouinlock Lake, Gouin Lake, Goulais Bay, Goulais Lake, Goulais River, Gould Creek, Goulding Lake, Goulet Bay, Goulet Creek, Goulet Lake, Gourd Lake, Gourlay Lake, Gourlie Creek, Govan Lake, Gove Lake, Gover Lake, Government Bay, Government Creek, Government Lake, Governor Bay, Gowan Creek, Gowan Lake, Gowar Bay, Goward Lake, Gowganda Bay, Gowganda Lake, Gowie Bay, Grabers Lake, Grab Lake, Grace Bay, Grace Creek, Graceful Lake, Grace Lake, Gracie Lake, Grady Lake, Graff Lake, Goose Lake, Goose Neck Bay, Gooseneck Creek, Gooseneck Lake, Gooseneck Rapids, Goose Pond, Goose River, Gord Lake, Gordon Bay, Gordon Creek, Gordon Lake, Gordon Rapids, Gordons Bay, Gordons Creek, Gore Bay, Gorge Creek, Gorge Creek Falls, Gorge Lake, Gorman Creek, Gorman Lake, Gorrnan River, Gormans Creek, Gormire Lake, Gormley Creek, Gornupkagama Lake, Gorrie Lake, Gorr Lakes, Gorse Creek, Gorse Lake, Gort Creek, Gort Lake, Goshawk Lake, Goshen Lake, Gosling Lake, Goldie Lake, Goldie River, Goldilocks Lake, Golding Lake, Gold Lake, Gold Mountain Lake, Goldsborough Creek, Goldsborough Lake, Gold Seekers Bay, Goldsmith Lake, Goldspink Lake, Goldstein Lake, Goldthrope Lake, Goldwin Creek, Goldwin Lake, Golf Course Bay, Golf Lake, Goltz Lake, Golub Lake, Gong Creek, Gong Lake, Gooch Creek, Gooch Lake, Goodchild Creek, Goodchild Lake, Goode Lake, Goodens Creek, Gooderham Creek, Gooderham Lake, Goodeve Lake, Goodfish Lake, Good Fortune Lake, Good Harbour, Goodie Creek, Goodie Lake, Goodier Lake, Goodkey Creek, Goodlad Lake, Good Lake, Goodliff Lake, Goodman Creek, Goodman Lake, Goodmorning Lakes, Goodoar Lake, Goodreau Lake, Goods Lake, Goodwill Lake, Goodwin Lake, Gooley Lake, Goosander Creek, Goosander Lake, Goose Bay, Gooseberry Brook, Gooseberry Creek, Gooseberry Lake, Goose Channel, Goose Creek, Goose Egg Lake, Gilder Creek, Gilder Lake, Glimmer Lake, Gling Lake, Gliskning Lake, Glitter Creek, Glitter Lake, Globe Creek, Globe Lake, Gloomy Lake, Glorious Lake, Glory Creek, Glory Lake, Glosser Bay, Gloucester Pool, Glover Bay, Glover Lake, Glovers Bay, Glue Lake, Glynn Lake, Gnat Lake, Gneiss Lake, Gneiss Rapids, Gnome Lake, Goat Creek, Goat Island Channel, Goat Lake, Goat River, Goblin Bay, Goblin Lake, Godda Lake, Goddard Lake, Godfrey Creek, Godfrey Lake, Godin Creek, Godin Lake, God's Lake, Godson Creek, Godson Lake, Goff Lake, Gog Lake, Gohere Bay, Go Home Bay, Go Home Lake, Go Home River, Going Lake, Golborne Lakes, Goldbar Lake, Gold Creek, Golden Creek, Goldeneye Lake, Golden Gate Lake, Golden Lake, Goldfield Creek, Goldfield Lake, Glass Falls, Glass Lake, Glassy Creek, Glassy Lake, Glay Lake, Glaze Lake, Gleason Brook, Gleason Lake, Gleave Lake, Gledhill Lake, Gleeson Lake, Glen Creek, Glendening Lake, Glen Erin Brook, Glenfield Creek, Glen Lake, Glenney Creek, Glenney Lake, Glenn Lake, Gillies Creek, Gillies Lake, Gilligan Creek, Gillin Lake, Gill Lake, Gillmor Lake, Gillnet Lake, Gill's Bay, Gilman Bay, Gilman Lake, Gilmour Bay, Gilmour Creek, Gilmour Lake, Gilroy Lake, Gilson Lake, Gilt Lake, Gimby Lake, Gimlet Lake, Gina Lake, Gin Creek, Ginger Lake, Gin Lake, Ginn Lake, Ginozhe Bay, Gipsy Lake, Giraffe Creek, Giraffe Lake, Girardin Pond, Girard Lake, Girdlestone Bay, Giroux Creek, Giroux Lake, Giroux River, Girty Lake, Girvan Creek, Girvan Lake, Girvin Lake, Gitche Lake, Gitche River, Gittins Lake, Giunta Lake, Giving Lake, Giwshkwebi Bay, Glabb Lake, Glacier Creek, Glacier Lake, Glade Lake, Gladstone Lake, Gladwin Creek, Gladwin Lake, Gladys Lake, Glaister Creek, Glaister Lake, Gilmor Lake, Glanmire Creek, Glanmire Lake, Glasford Lake, Glasgow Lake, Glasgow Pond, Glass By, Glasser Lake, Gessie Lake, Ghee Lake, Ghost Bay, Ghost Creek, Ghost Lake, Ghost River, Giacomo Lake, Gibbery Lake, Gibb Lake, Gibboney Lake, Gibbons Lake, Gibbons Lake, Gibi Lake, Gibraltar Bay, Gibraltar Lake, Gibson Creek, Gibson Lake, Gibson River, Gibsons Bay, Gibsorns Lake, Gids Harbour, Giffins Lake, Gifford Bay, Gifford Lake, Gignac Lake, Giguere Lake, Gilbert Creek, Gilbert Lake, Gilboe Lake, Gilby Lake; Gilchrist Bay, Gilchrist Creek, Gilchrist Lake, Gilden Lake, Gills Bay, Gilhuly Lake, Gillard Lake, Gilleach Lake, Gilleran Lake, Genessee Bay, Genessee Lake, Geneva Creek, Geneva Lake, Genier Greek, Genier Lake, Gennis Lake, Genoa Creek, Genoa Lake, Genricks Lake, Gentian Creek, Gentian Lake, Gentleman Creek, Geoffrey Lake, Geoffrion Lake, Geometry Lake, Geordie Lake, Geordies Lake, George Creek, George Lake, Georges Bay, George's Lake, Georgia Lake, Georgian Bay, Georgie Creek, Georgina Lake, Geraldine Lake --

Mr Mammoliti: On a point of order: I just want to remind the leader of the third party that he is holding up a number of injured workers, who are waiting for committee to start, because of his tactics -- rude, insensitive tactics, mind you. This, Mr Speaker, has got to stop. There are a number of people waiting to start committee and because of the leader of the third party it is not happening.

Interjections.

The Deputy Speaker: Order. This is not a point of order.

Mrs Marland: On the same point of order: I feel it is singularly significant that this member has now risen in the House on two so-called points of order, only to bc told that they are not points of order. I would be ashamed if I had served in this House for the amount of time that he has --

The Deputy Speaker: Would you take your seat, please? The leader of the third party.

Mr Harris: I thank the member for Yorkview for the little break. I am sorry the taxpayers will not give him an apartment. I believe I --

Interjections.

The Deputy Speaker: Order, please. There are procedures and we have to follow the procedures. These procedures apply to all of us.

Mr Harris: Before I was rudely interrupted with that time-wasting point of order: Geraldine Lake, Gerald Lake, Gerber Lake, Gerloch Creek, German Bay, German Lake, German Mills Creek, Gerow Lake, Gerrard Lake, Gerry Creek, Gerry Lake, Gertrude Lake, Gervais Lake, Gervis Lake; Alfreda Creek, Alfreda Island, Alfreda Lake, Alfred Inlet, Alfred Lake, Algocen Lake, Algonquin Lake, Alguire Lake, Alice Creek, Alice Lake, Alike Lake, Alister Lake, Aljo Lake, Alkenore Lake, Allan Creek, Allan Lake --

Interjections.

The Deputy Speaker: Order.

Mr Harris: -- Allan Rapids, Callans Creek, Allard Lake, Allely Creek, Allely Lake, Allenby Creek, Allenby Lake, Allen Creek, Allen Lake, Allen Lakes, Allen Rapids, Allens Creek, Allens Lakes, Alligator Creek, Alligator Lake, Allingham Creek, Allin Lake, Allison Lake, Allman's Bay, Allumette Lake, Alluring Creek, Alma Creek, Alma Lake, Almas Bay, Alm Lake, Almond Lake, Almonte Lake, Almonte Rapids, Aloft Lake, Along Bay, Alona Bay Creek, Alonghill Lake, Alpha Lake, Alph Creek, Alph Lake, Alphonse Bay, Alpine Lake, Alport Lake, Alps Creek, Alsever Lake, Alstone Lake, Altar Lake, Altimeter Creek, Altimeter Lake, Altitude Lake, Altitude Creek, Alto Lake, Alton Lake, Alva Lake, Alves Bay, Alvin Lake, Alwyn Lake, Amabel Creek, Amable du Fond River, Amable Lakes, Amaleen Lake, Amateewakea River, Arnberley Beach, Ambrose Lake, Ambursh Bay, Amelia Lake, Ameliasbury Mill Pond, Ament Bay, American Cabin Lake, American Channel, Ames Creek, Amesdale Lake, Ames Lake, Ameson Creek, Ameson Lake, Amethyst Bay, Amethyst Harbour, Amethyst Lake, Amewin River, Amherst Bay, Amherstbury Harbour, Amikeus Creek, Amikeus Lake, Amik Lake, Amikogaming Lake, Amikougami Creek, Amik River, Amisk Creek, Amit Lake, Amlin Lake, Amoeba Lake, Amos Creek, Anios Lake, Amphibolite Bay, Amp Lake, Amra Lake, Amundsen Creek, Amwri Creek, Amwri Lake, Amy Falls, Amy Lake, Amylou Lake, Amyoa Creek, Amyoa Lake, Amyot Creek, Anaharea Creek, Anaharea Lake, Anahareo Creek, Anahareo Lake, Ana Lake, Anape Lake, Anaway Creek, Anaway Lake, Ancaster Creek, Anchicum Bay, Anchorage Bay, Anchor Lake, Ancliff Lake, Ancona Bay, Anders Lake, Anderson Creek, Anderson Lake, Anderson's Bay, Andre Creek, Andre Lake, Andress Lake, Andrew Bay, Andrew Lake, Andrews Bay, Caba Lake, Cabin Bay, Cabin Lake, Cabin Rapids, Cab Lake, Cable Creek, Cable Lake, Caboose Lake, Cabot Lake, Cache Bay, Cache Creek, Cachege Lake, Cache Lake, Cache Rapids, Cache River, Cadawaja Creek, Cadawaja Lake, Caddy Creek, Caddy Lake, Cadre Lake, Caesar Lake, Cahill Creek, Cahill Lake, Caibaiosai Lake, Cain Lake, Cairngorrn Lake, Cairn Lake, Cairns Lake, Cairns River, Cairo Creek, Cairo Lake, Caithness Creek, Caithness Lake, Calabogie Lake, Calais Creek, Calais Lake, Calamity Creek, Calamity Lake, Calbeck Lake, Calbert Creek, Calcite Lake, Calcite Creek, Calcite Rapids, Cal Creek, Calder Creek, Calder Lake, Caldwell Lake, Caledon Creek, Caledonia Creek, Caledon Lake, Caley Lake, Calf Lake, Calf Rapids, Calhoun Lake, Caliper Lake, Callaghan Lake, Callahan Bay, Callahan Lake, Cal Lake, Callander Bay, Callery Lake, Callicut Lake, Callinan Lake, Call Lake, Calm Bay, Calm Lake, Calong Lake, Calpin Lake, Calstock Creek, Calstock Lake, Calumet Lake, Calverley's Pond, Calvert Creek, Calvert Lake, Calvin Lake, Calwin Falls, Camden Lake, Camel Lake, Camelot Lake, Camel Read Lake, Cameo Lake, Cameron Bay, Cameron Creek, Cameron Falls, Cameron Lake, Camerons Bay, Camerons Lake, Cameron's Pool, Cameroon Lake, Cam Lake, Cammack Lake, Camp Bay, Campbell Bay, Campbell Creek, Campbell Lake, Campbell's Bay, Campbell's Creek, Campbellville Pond, Campcot Lake, Camp Creek, Camp Eleven Lake, Camper Creek, Camp Lake, Camp Falls, Camp 50 Bay, Campfire Creek, Campfire Lake, Campfire River, Camp Five Lake, Camp Four Lake, Camp 14 Creek, Camp 14 Lake, Campground Lake, Camphouse Lake, Camping Lake, Campion Rapids, Camp Island Lake, Camp Lake, Camp Nine Creek, Camp Nine Lake, Camp One Bay, Camp One Lake, Campover Lake, Camp River, Camproad Creek, Camproad Lake, Camp 7 Bay, Camp 7 Lake, Camp 6 Bay, Camp Six Lake, Camp Six Rapids, Campstool Lake, Campten Bay, Camp Ten Bay, Camp Ten Lake, Camp 36 Lake, Camp Three Bay, Camp Three Lake, Camp Three Rapids, Camp Two Lake, Campus Creek, Campus Lake, Carnrose Lake, Canada Jay Lake, Canadensis Lake, Canadian Channel, Canagagigue Creek, Cana Lake, Canal Bay, Aaron Creek, Aaron Lake, Abalard Creek, Abamasagi Lake, Abamategwia Lake, Abams Lake, Abate Lake, Abbe Creek, Abbe Lake, Abbess Lake, Abbey Creek, Abbey Dawn Creek, Abbey Lake, Abbie Lake, Abbotsford Creek, Abbotsford Lake, Abbott Creek, Abbott Lake, Abe Creek, Abelson Lake, Aberarder Creek, Aber Creek, Aberdeen Creek, Aberdeen Lake, Aberfoyle Creek, Aber Lake, Abernethy Lake, Abes Lake, Abie Lake, Abigogami Creek, Abigogami Lake, Abimatinu Lake, Abimatinu River, Abinette Lake, Abinette River, Abitibi River, Abitibi Lake, Abney Lake, Abram Lake, Abs Lake, Acanthus Lake, Ace Lake, Acer Lake, Achapi Lake, Acheson Lake, Achigan Creek, Achigan Lake, Acid Lake, Acker Lake, Ackert Drain, Acme Lake, Acolyte Lake, Aconda Lake, Acorn Lake, Acre Lake, Acton Lake, Acton Pond, Adagio Lake, Adair Creek, Adair Lake, Ada Lake, Adamac Lake, Adam Creek, Adamhay Lake, Adam Lake, Adam's Bay, Adams Creek, Adams Lake, Adamson Lake, Adams Pond, Adams River, Adams River Bay, Adanac Lake, Adanac Creek, Addie Lake, Addington Lake, Addison Lake, Add Lake, Adelaide Creek, Adelaide Lake, Adelard Lake, Adele Lake, Adel Lake, Adik Creek, Adik Lake, Adios Lake, Adrniral Creek, Admiral Lake, Admit Lake, Adobe Lake, Adogio Lake, Adrains Creek, Adrian Lake, Adrienne Lake, Adventure Creek, Adventure Lake, Adze Lake, Aegean Creek, Aegean Lake, Aerial Lake, Aerobus Bay --

Mr Mammoliti: On a point of order, Mr Speaker: A number of times the individuals who are holding up the House have brought up what we are doing as far as the Agenda for People is concerned. Some 13,000 workers are waiting for our wage protection bill, and they are holding it up with these antics.

1630

The Deputy Speaker: Order. This is not a point of order.

Interjections.

The Deputy Speaker: The member for Yorkview, I would ask you to keep quiet.

Interjections.

Mrs Marland: On a point of order, Mr Speaker: One of the conditions of being a member in this Legislature is to know the rules of order, and I see that the whip for the government caucus is in the House at this time. It is also a rule of the House -- for those members who are making interjection -- that interjections are not permitted. Since the government whip is in the House, it might be advisable for her to help her members know the rules of order, that we do not have the continuous interruptions

The Deputy Speaker: Order, please. It is the role of the Speaker to make sure that order is kept in the House. I thank you for the advice. I will make sure that I abide by some of the advice that you have given me, and I think I do a fairly good job. I would ask the leader of the third party to take over.

Mr Mammoliti: On that point of order, Mr Speaker.

The Deputy Speaker: Please take your seat. If you have a legitimate point of order, I will accept it. Do you have a legitimate point of order?

Mr Mammoliti: I do not know.

The Deputy Speaker: Let me listen to it.

Mr Mammoliti: The point of order is this: She has made all kinds of accusations and I say to you that I do --

The Deputy Speaker: Please take your seat.

Interjections.

The Deputy Speaker: Order, please. This is your time.

Mrs Marland: Mr Speaker, I have a point of privilege: I take strong exception to the comments of the member for Yorkview. I feel that he is infringing on my privilege by standing in this House saying that I am making "all kinds of accusations," and I quote his comment. I would ask that he stand in this House and withdraw that comment against my previous statement.

The Deputy Speaker: I do not see any point for the member for Yorkview to make any excuse whatsoever.

Mr Harris: I am sorry the member for Yorkview did not get the extra money for his apartment that he wanted to change all the rules for, but if he is still upset with that, then what the heck.

I think I left off at -- Mr Speaker, I thank you for maintaining order. I think you are doing a fine job in very trying circumstances -- Aerobus Creek, Aerobus Lake, Aerofoil Lake, Aeroplane Lake, Affleck Lake, A-Frame Lake, Again River, Agam Lake, Agar Lake, Agassiz Lake, Agate Creek, Agate Lake, Agawa Bay, Agawa Lake, Agawa River, Agawask Creek, Agimak Lake, Agnes Lake, Agnes River, Agnew Lake, Agonzon Lake, Agreen Lake, Aguasabon River, Aguasabon Lake, Ague Lake, Agusada Creek, Agusada Lake, Agusk Lake, Agutua Lake, Agutua River, Agwa Bay, Agwasuk River, Agwatik River, Ahdik Lake, Ahern Lake, Ahmabel Lake, Ahme Lake, Ahme Creek, Ahmic Creek, Ahmic Lake, Ahsin Bay, Ahsine Creek, Ahsine Lake, Aide Creek, Aide Lake, Aidie Creek, Aikens Lake, Aikman Lake, Aileen Lake, Ainslie Lake, Air Base Bay, Aird Bay, Aird Lake, Airfield Creek, Air Hole Lake, Airplane Lake, Airport Drain, Airport Lake, Airstrip Lake, Airy Creek, Airy Lake, Aitken Creek, Aitken Lake, Ajax Lake, Akandamo Lakes, Akandamo River, Akebia Creek, Akebia Lake, Akey Lake, Aki Lake, Aikin Lakes, Akonesi Creek, Akonesi Lake, Akonewi Lake, Akow Lake, Akron Creek, Akron Lake, Alabama Lake, A Lake, Alaska's Lake, Alba Lake, Albany River, Cox Bay, Cox Creek, Cox Lake, Cox's Lake, Coy Lake, Coyle Creek, Coyle Lake, Coyne Lake, Coyston Lake, CPR Bay, Crabcraw Creek, Crabclaw Lake, Crab Lake, Crabtree Lake, Cracknell Lake, Crackshot Lake, Craddock Creek, Craddock Lake, Cradle Creek, Cradle Lake, Craft Creek, Craft Lake, Crag Lake.

I see we have changed Speakers. I would like to welcome the new Speaker to the chair and thank the previous Speaker for maintaining order with this rowdy group.

I believe I was at Craft Lake, Crag Lake, Craig Lake, Craignative Lake, Craigs Creek, Craig's Swamp, Crain Lake, Crains Lake, Cramadog Creek, Cramadog Lake, Cramp Creek, Cramp Lake, Cranberry Bay, Cranberry Creek, Cranberry Lake, Chenier Lake, Cherie Creek, Cherniuk Lake, Cherries Bay, Cherrington Lake, Cherry Creek, Cherry Lake, Cherry River, Chesakan Creek, Chesakan Lake, Chesley Lake, Chesney Bay, Chesterfield Bay, Chesterfield Creek, Chesterfield Lake, Chester Lake, Chewink Creek, Chewink Lake, Chiah Lake, Chiblow Lake, Chicago Bay, Chicault Lake, Chickadee Lake, Chicken Farm Lake, Chicken Liver Channel, Chick Lake, Chicobi Lake, Chicot Lake, Chief Bay, Chief Creek, Chief Lake, Chief Peter, Chief's Creek, Chiki Lake, Chilcott Lake, Childerhorse Creek, Childerhorse Lake, Chill Creek, Chill Lake, Chilton Lake, Chimahagan River, Chime Lake, China Lake, Chin Creek, Chiniguchi River, Chiniguchi Lake, Chin Lake, Chin River, Chipai River, Chipai Lake, Chipchase Lake, Chipican Lake, Chip Lake, Chipman Lake, Chipmunk Creek, Chipmunk Lake, Chippawa Channel, Chippego Lake, Chippewa Creek, Chippy Lake, Chisamore Lake, Chisholm Drain, Chit Lake, Fade Lake, Fagan Lake, Fagan Ponds, Fagus Bay, Fahey Lake, Fairbairn Creek, Fairbairn Lake, Fairbanks Creek, Fairchild Creek, Fairchild Lake, Faircloth Lake, Fairholme Lake, Fair Lake, Fairloch Lake, Fairplay Lake, Fairs Creek, Fairview Creek, Fairy Creek, Fairy Lake, Faith Lake, Fakeloo Lake, Fakeloo Creek, Falan Lake, Falby Lake, Falcon Lake, Fall Creek, Fallduck Lakes, Fallen Creek, Fallen Lake, Fall-In-Lake, Fallis Pond, Fall Lake, Fallon Island, Falloon Lake, Fall River, Fallscamp Creek, Fallscamp Lake, Falls Lake, Falls River, False Creek, False Lake, Falsetto Lake, Fan Lake, Fanny Lake, Fanshawe Lake, Fansher Lake, Faraday Creek, Faraday Lake, Farah Lake, Farden Lake, Farewell Bay, Farewell Lake, Faries Lake, Faris Lake, Farlain Lake, Far Lake, Farlane Lake, Farlette Lake, Farley Lake, Farleys Creek, Farlinger Lake, Farrn Bay, Farrn Bay Lake, Farm Creek, Farmer Lake, Farm Lake, Farncomb Lake, Farncomb Creek, Farner Lake, Farnes Lake, Farnham Creek, Farquhar Creek, Farquhar Lake, Farr Creek, Farrel Creek, Farrel Lake, Farrell Lake, Farrer Lake, Farrington Lake, Farrington Creek, Farrow Lake, Farwell Creek, Fassett Lake, Fatima Lake, Fat Lake, Fat River, Fatty Creek, Fatty Lake, Faubert Lake, Faulkenham Lake, Faulk Lake, Faulkner Lake, Fault Creek, Fault Lake, Faultside Lake, Fauquier Lake, Favel Bay, Favel Lake, Favell Bay, Favot Creek, Fawcett Lake, Fawn Creek, Fawn Lake, Fawthrop Lake, Faya Lake, Feagan Lake, Fear Lake, Fearless Lake, Feather Lake, Feather River, Feaver Lake, Fecteau Lake, Fee Lake, Feely Creek, Feely Lake, Feeny Lake, Feist Creek, Feist Lake, Felcite Lake, Feldman Lake, Feline Lake, Felix Lake, Fells Bay --

Mr Huget: Veronica Lake.

Mr Harris: We are three days away from getting to Veronica Lake, but pardon that aside.

Felsen Creek, Felsen Lake, Felst Lake, Felt Lake, Felto Lake, Fenelon River, Fen Lake, Fennah Lake, Fennell Lake, Fenn Lake, Fenson Lake, Fenton Lake, Fergus Lake, Fergus Creek, Ferguson Lake, Ferguson Bay, Ferguson Creek, Ferguson Drain, Fergusons Lake, Ferland's Lake, Fermoy Lake, Fern Creek, Ferndale Bay, Fern Lake, Fernley Drain, Fernlund Lake, Fernow Lake, Fernow River, Ferns Lake, Ferrier Creek, Ferrie River, Ferrim Lake, Ferris Lake, Festuca Lake, Fetter Lake, Fewster Drain, Fib Lake, Ficht Lake, Fiddler Lake, Fidler River, Fido Lake, Field's Lake, Fife Lake, Fifteen Lake, Fifteen Mile Creek, Fifteen Mile Lake, Fifteen Mile Pond, Fifth Lake, Fifty Creek, Fifty Dollar Lake, Fifty Nine Lake, Fifty Two Lake, Fillet Creek, Fillet Lake, Fillion Lake, Fills Lake, Film Lake, Filter Creek, Filter Lake, Final Lake, Fin Bay, Finch Lake, Fin Creek, Findlay Creek, Findlay Creek, Findlay Lake, Fine Lake, Finger Bay, Finger Lake, Finish Lake, Fink Lake, Fin Lake, Finland Creek, Finlay Bay, Finlay Creek, Finlayson Creek, Finlayson Lake, Finnegan Lake, Finney Creek, Finney Lake, Finn Lake, Finton Lake, Fintry Creek, Fire Creek, Firefly Creek, Firefly Lake, Fire Hill Creek, Fire Hill Lake, Fire Lake, Fireline Lake, Firella Creek, Fire River, Firesand River, Firesteel River, Firetail Creek, Firetail Lake, Fir Lake, Firman's Creek, First Concession Drain, First Creek, First Depot Lake, First Egan Lake, First Government Lake, First James Lake, First Justin Lake, First Kargus Lake, First Lake, First Loon Creek, First Loon Lake, Firth Creek, Firth Lake, Fischer Lake, Fishbasket Lake, and that it now be read the first time.

1650

The Acting Speaker (Mr Villeneuve): Mr Harris moves that leave be given to introduce a bill entitled An Act to require the Minister of the Environment to discharge her responsibilities under Section 15(1) of the Ontario Water Resources Act to determine the Zebra Mussel content of Cana Lake, Canal Bay, Canal Lake, Canard Lake, Canard River, Canary Lake, Cancer Lake, Candide Creek, Candide Lake, Candler Lake, Candybar Creek, Candybar Lake, Candy Creek, Cane Lake, Canisbay Creek, Canisbay Lake, Canis Lake, Canister Creek, Canister Lake, Can Lake, Canna Creek, Canna Lake, Cannard's Bay, Canniff Creek, Canniff Lake, Canning Lake, Cannings Falls, Cannon Creek, Cannon Lake, Canoe Bay, Canoe Bay Channel, Canoe Channel, Canoe Creek, Canoe Lake, Canoeshed Lake, Canon Creek, Canon Lake --

Mr Klopp: On a point of personal privilege, Mr Speaker: In the interest of the pages, if you wish to read the whole thing when most of us have already heard it, would there be any chance that at least we could have our pages sit down and not have to stand, please?

The Acting Speaker: That is not a point of personal privilege, as I am sure the member understands.

Mr Grandmaître: Consideration.

The Acting Speaker: It is a point of consideration, that is right. Is it the pleasure of the House that the pages may be seated during the rather lengthy reading of this motion?

Agreed to.

The Acting Speaker: We have unanimous agreement. The pages may be seated if they so desire.

-- Canonto Lake, Can Opener Lake, Canterbury Lake, Canthook Lake, Cantin Lake, Cantley Creek, Cantley Lake, Canton Lake, Cantrill Lake, Canty Lake, Canvas-back Lake, Canyon Creek, Canyon Falls, Canyon Lake, Canyon River, Cap Creek, Capee Lake, Cape Harbour, Cape Hurd Channel, Capella Lake, Capin Lake, Cap Lake, Capper Lake, Capre Lake, Capreol Lake, Capricornus Lake, Capsell Lake, Captain Lake, Captains Lake, Captain Tom Lake, Capton Lake, Caput Lake, Carafel Creek, Carafel Lake, Caragana Lake, Caramat Creek, Caramat Lake, Carcajou Bay, Carcajou Creek, Carcajou Lake, Carcass Lake, Card Bay, Carder Lake, Cardiff Creek, Cardiff Lake, Cardinal Creek, Cardinalis Lake, Cardinal Lake, Card Lake, Cards Lake, Cardwell Lake, Carew Lake, Carey Creek, Carey Lake, Carfrae Lake, Cargill Lake, Cargill Mill Pond, Carhess Creek, Cariad Lake, Carib Creek, Carib Lake, Cariboo Creek, Cariboo Lake, Caribou Bay, Caribou Creek, Caribou Lake, Caribou Rapids, Caribou River, Caribou Throat Lake, Caribus Lake, Carillon Rapids, Carkner Lake, Car Lake, Carl Bay, Carlbom Lake,

Carl Creek, Carleton Lake, Carling Bay, Carling Lake, Carl Lake, Carlo Lake, Carlson Lake, Carstead Bay, Carlton Lake, Carlyle Lake, Carman Bay, Carman Creek, Car man Lake, Carmichael Lake, Carnachan Bay, Carnahan Lake, Carney Creek, Carney Lake, Carnilac Lake, Caro Lake, Caroline Lake, Carol Lake, Carolyn Creek, Caron Creek, Caron Lake, Carpenter Lake, Carpenter River, Carpet Lake, Carp Lake, Carp River, Carre Lake, Carrick Creek, Carrick Lake, Carrie Lake, Carriere Lake, Carrigan Lake, Carrington Lake, Carroll Creek, Carroll Lake, Carroll Wood Bay, Carrot Lake, Carruthers Lake, Carrying Lake, Carry Lake, Carscallen Lake, Carson Bay, Carson Creek, Carson Lake, Carss Creek, Carstens Lake, Carswell Lake, Cartan Lake, Carter Bay, Carter Lake, Carter Rapids, Carthew Bay, Cartier Lake, Cartier Creek, Cart Lake, Cartwrights Creek, Carty Creek, Carty Lake, Carver Lake, Cascade Falls, Cascade Lake, Cascaden Lake, Cascade Rapids, Cascade River, Cascanette Lake, Case River, Casey Creek, Casey Lake, Casgrain Creek, Casgrain Lake, Cash Creek, Cashel Lake, Cashman Creek, Cashore Creek, Casino Lake, Caskie Bay, Caskill Lake, Cask Lake, Casper Lake, Casque Lake, Cassdaga Lake, Casselman's Lake, Casselman's Creek, Cassels Lake, Cassidy Bay, Cassidy Creek, Cassidy Lake, Cassidys Bay, Cass Lake, Casson Lake, Castellar Creek, Castellar Lake, Castelbar Creek, Castelbar Lake, Castel Bay, Castle Creek, Castle Lake, Castleman Lake, Castlewood Creek, Castlewood Lake, Castor Creek, Castor Lake, Castoroil Lake, Castor Ponds, Castor River, Castra Lake, Casummit Lake, Caswell Bay, Caswell Lake, Cataract Falls, Cataract Lake, Cataraqui Bay, Cataraqui River, Catastrophe Creek, Catastrophe Lake, Catawba Lake, Cat Bay, Catchacoma Lake, Catcher Lake, Cat Creek, Caterpillar Lake, Cat Falls, Catfish Bay, Catfish Creek, Catfish Lake, Catfish Rapids, Catharine Lake, Cathro Lake, Cathy's Lake, Catlonite Creek, Catlonite Lake, Cat River, Cat Tail River, Cattral Lake, Cauchon Creek, Cauchon Lake, Caufield Lake, Cauley Lake, Cauliflower Creek, Cauliflower Lake, Caulkin Lake, Caution Lake, Cavalary Creek, Cavalary Lake, Cavanagh Lake, Cavan Lake, Cavano Lake, Cave Harbour, Cave Lake, Cavell Creek, Cavell Lake, Cavendish Lake, Caverly's Bay, Cavern Creek Cavern Lake, Cavers Bay, Cavern Creek, Cavern Lake, Cavers Bay, Cavers Creek, Cavers Lake, Caviar Lake, Cawanogami Lake, Cawdron Creek, Cawdron Lake, Cawing Lake, Cawston Lakes, Cawston Lakes, Cawthra Creek, Caya's Lake, Cayer Creek, Cayer Lake, Cayiens Creek, Caysee Lake, Cayuga Creek, Cayuga Lake, Cebush Lake, Cecebe Lake, Cecil Creek, Cecile Lake, Cedar Bay, Cedarbough Lake, Cedarclump Lake, Cedar Creek, Cedar Falls, Cedargum Lake, Cedar Harbour, Cedar Lake, Cedar Rapids, Cedar River, Cedarskirt Lake, Cedric Lake, Cee Creek, Ceepee Lake, Celastruc Lake, Cellist Lake, Celt Creek, Celtis Lake, Celt Lake, Cemetery Creek, Cemetery Lake, Centennial Lake, Centralis Creek, Centralis Lake, Central Lake, Centre Channel, Centre Creek, Centre Falls, Centrefire Creek, Centrefire Lake, Centre Lake, Centreville Creek, Ceph Lake, Ceres Lake, Cerulean Lake, Cerullo Lake, Chabbie Lake, Chabbie River, Chabot Lake, Chadwick Lake, Chagma Lake, Chagnon Lake, Chaillon Lake, Chain Creek, Chain Lake, Chain Lakes, The Chain of Lakes, Chainy Creek, Chainy Lake, Chair Lake, Chalet Creek, Chalet Lake, Chalice Lake, Chalk Bay, Chalk Creek, Chalkend Lake, Chalk Lake, Chalk River, Challener Lake, Challener River, Challis Lake, Chalmers Lake, Chamandy Lake, Chamberlain Lake, Chamber Lake, Chambers Lake, Champagne Lake, Champlain Creek, Champlain Trail Lakes, Chance Lake, Chancellor Lake, Chandos Lake, Change Lake, Chanley Lake, Channel Lake, Channel Lakes, Green River, Greenrod Lake, Greens Bay, Green's Creek, Greenshields Lake, Greenshore Lake, Greensides Lake, Greens Lake, Greenstone Rapids, Greensward Lake, Green Tree Lake, Greenwater Creek, Greenwater Lake, Greenwich Creek, Greenwich Lake, Greenwood Lake, Greenwood River, Greer Creek, Greer Lake, Greers Bay, Greggio Lake, Greggs Lake, Gregory Bay, Gregory Creek, Gregory Lake, Grehan Lake, Greig Lake, Gremm Lake, Grenadier Creek, Grenadier Lake, Grenadier Pond, Grenfell Lake, Grenier Lake, Grenville Lake, Greske Lake, Greta Lake, Gretchel Creek, Gretchel Lake, Gretel Creek, Gretel Lake, Grew Lake, Grew River, Grey Duck Lake, Grey Lake, Grelava Lake, Grey Owl Bay, Grey Owl Lake, Green Creek, Greengrass Lake, Greenheart Creek, Greenheart Lake, Greenhedge Lake, Greenhill Lake, Greenhill Rapids, Greenhill River, Greenhorn Bay, Greenhue Lake, Greening Lake, Greening's Bay, Greenish Creek, Greenish Lake, Green Island Bay, Green Island Lake, Green Lake, Green Lakes, Greenland Lake, Greenlaw Lake, Greenleaf Creek, Greenleaf Lake, Greenlee Lake, Greenmantle Lake, Greenmantle River, Greenock Creek, Greenock Lake, Greenough Harbour, Greenpike Lake, Gravel Lake, Gravel Lakes, Gravelly Bay, Gravelpit Lake, Gravel Pit Pond, Gravelridge Lake, Gravel River, Gravenor Lake, Graves Lake, Graveyard Creek, Graveyard Lake, Graveyard Rapids, Gravy Lake, Grawbarger Lake, Grawbarger's Rapids, Graydarl Lake, Graydon Lake, Gray Lake, Grayling Lake, Graymud Lake, Gray Rapids, Grays Bay, Grays Creek, Grays Lake, Grayson Lake, Grayson River, Grays River, Graystone Lake, Graytrout Lake, Grazing Lake, Grazing River, Great Lake, Great Mountain Lake, Great North Bay, Great Portage Lake, Great South Bay, Grebe Lake, Greb Lake, Green Bay, Greenbough Lake, Green Bug Lake, Greenbush Lake, Green Creek, Grants Lake, Granzies Lake, Grape Lake, Graphic Creek, Graphic Lake, Graphite Lake, Grapnel Bay, Grapnel Creek, Grapnel Lake, Grasett Lake, Grass Creek, Grasser Lake, Grass Hill Lake, Grass Lake, Grassy Bay, Grassy Creek, Grassy Lake, Grassy Portage Bay, Grassy River, Gratton Creek, Gratton Lake, Grave Bay, Grave Creek, Grave Lake, Gravel Bay, Gravel Beach Lake, Gravel Falls, Graham Bay, Graham Creek, Graham Lake, Grahams Creek, Graham's Lake, Granary Creek, Granary Lake, Grand Bay, Grand Campment Bay, Grande Lake, Grandeur Lake, Grand Lake, Grandmaison Lake, Grandma Lake, Grandma Stevens Pond, Grandolph Bay, Grandpa Lake, Grand pop's Lake, Grand Rapids, Grand River, Grandview Lake, Granite Bay, Graniteboss Lake, Granite Creek, Granite Falls, Granitehill Lake, Granite Lake, Granite River, Granitic Lake, Granka Lake, Granny Bay, Granny's Creek, Grano Lake, Grant Bay, Grant Creek, Grant Lake, Grant Point Harbour, Grants Creek, Grants Creek Bay, Gosselin Creek, Gosselin Lake, Gosselin's Bay, Goss Lake, Goudreau Creek, Goudreau Lake, Goudy Creek, Goudy Lake, Gough Creek, Gough Lake, Gouinlock Lake, Gouin Lake, Goulais Bay, Goulais Lake, Goulais River, Gould Creek Goulding Lake, Goulet Bay, Goulet Creek, Goulet Lake, Gourd Lake, Gourlay Lake, Gourlie Creek, Govan Lake, Gove Lake, Gover Lake, Government Bay, Government Creek, Government Lake, Governor Bay, Gowan Creek, Gowan Lake, Gowar Bay, Goward Lake, Gowganda Bay, Gowganda Lake, Gowie Bay, Grabers Lake, Grab Lake, Grace Bay, Grace Creek, Graceful Lake, Grace Lake, Gracie Lake; Grady Lake, Graff Lake, Goose Lake, Goose Neck Bay, Gooseneck Creek, Gooseneck Lake, Gooseneck Rapids, Goose Pond, Goose River, Gord Lake, Gordon Bay, Gordon Creek, Gordon Lake, Gordon Rapids, Gordons Bay, Gordons Creek, Gore Bay, Gorge Creek, Gorge Creek Falls, Gorge Lake, Gorman Creek, Gorman Lake, Gorman River, Gormans Creek, Gormire Lake, Gormley Creek, Gornupkagama Lake, Gorrie Lake, Gorr Lakes, Gorse Creek, Gorse Lake, Gort Creek, Gort Lake, Goshawk Lake, Goshen Lake, Gosling Lake, Goldie Lake, Goldie River, Goldilocks Lake, Golding Lake, Gold Lake, Gold Mountain Lake, Goldsborough Creek, Goldsborough Lake, Gold Seekers Bay, Goldsmith Lake, Goldspink Lake, Goldstein Lake, Goldthorpe Lake, Coldwin Creek, Goldwin Lake, Golf Course Bay, Golf Lake, Goltz Lake, Golub Lake, Gong Creek, Gong Lake, Gooch Creek, Gooch Lake, Goodchild Creek, Goodchild Lake, Goode Lake, Goodens Creek, Gooderham Creek, Gooderham Lake, Goodeve Lake, Goodfish Lake, Good Fortune Lake, Good Harbour, Goodie Creek, Goodie Lake, Goodier Lake, Goodkey Creek, Goodlad Lake, Good Lake, Goodliff Lake, Goodman Creek, Goodman Lake, Goodmorning Lakes, Goodoar Lake; Goodreau Lake, Goods Lake, Goodwill Lake, Goodwin Lake, Gooley Lake, Goosander Creek, Goosander Lake, Goose Bay, Gooseberry Brook, Gooseberry Creek, Gooseberry Lake, Goose Channel, Goose Creek, Goose Egg Lake, Gilder Creek, Gilder Lake, Glimmer Lake, Gling Lake, Gliskning Lake, Glitter Creek, Glitter Lake, Globe Creek, Globe Lake, Gloomy Lake, Glorious Lake, Glory Creek, Glory Lake, Glosser Bay, Gloucester Pool, Glover Bay, Glovers Lake, Glovers Bay, Glue Lake, Glynn Lake, Gnat Lake, Gneiss Lake, Gneiss Rapids, Gnome Lake, Goat Creek, Goat Island Channel, Goat Lake, Goat River, Goblin Bay, Goblin Lake, Godda Lake, Goddard Lake, Godfrey Creek, Godfrey Lake, Godin Creek, Godin Lake, God's Lake, Godson Creek, Godson Lake, Goff Lake, Gog Lake, Gohere Bay, Go Home Bay, Go Home Lake, Go Home River, Going Lake, Golborne Lakes, Goldbar Lake, Gold Creek, Golden Creek, Goldeneye Lake, Golden Gate Lake, Golden Lake, Goldfield Creek, Goldfield Lake, Glass Falls, Glass Lake, Glassy Creek, Glassy Lake, Glay Lake, Glaze Lake, Gleason Brook, Gleason Lake, Gleave Lake, Gledhill Lake, Gleeson Lake, Glen Creek, Glendening Lake, Glen Erin Brook, Glenfield Creek Glen Lake, Glenney Creek, Glenney Lake, Glenn Lake, Gillies Creek, Gillies Lake, Gilligan Creek, Gillin Lake, Gill Lake, Gillmor Lake, Gillnet Lake, Gill's Bay, Gilman Bay, Gilman Lake, Gilmour Bay, Gilmour Creek, Gilmour Lake, Gilroy Lake, Gilson Lake, Gilt Lake, Gimby Lake, Gimlet Lake, Gina Lake, Gin Creek, Ginger Lake, Gin Lake, Ginn Lake, Ginozhe Bay, Gipsy Lake, Giraffe Creek Giraffe Lake, Girardin Pond, Girard Lake, Girdlestone Bay, Giroux Creek, Giroux Lake, Giroux River, Girty Lake, Girvan Creek, Girvan Lake, Girvin Lake, Gitche Lake, Gitche River, Gittins Lake, Giunta Lake, Giving Lake, Giwshkwebi Bay, Glabb Lake, Glacier Creek, Glacier Lake, Glade Lake, Gladstone Lake, Gladwin Creek, Gladwin Lake, Gladys Lake, Glaister Creek, Glaister Lake, Gilmor Lake, Glanmire Creek, Glanmire Lake, Glasford Lake, Glasgow Lake, Glasgow Pond, Glass Bay, Glasser Lake, Gessie Lake, Ghee Lake, Ghost Bay, Ghost Creek, Ghost Lake, Ghost River, Giacomo Lake, Gibberry Lake --

Mr Sterling: Dispense.

The Acting Speaker: Agreed? Dispense. We have unanimous consent.

Clerk Assistant and Clerk of Journals: This is a bill entitled An Act to require the Minister of the Environment to discharge her responsibilities under Section 15(1) of the Ontario Water Resources Act to determine the zebra mussel content of Cana Lake, Canal Bay, Canal Lake, Canard Lake, Canard River, Canary Lake, Cancer Lake, Candide Creek --

An hon member: Dispense.

The Acting Speaker: There has to be unanimous consent of the House. Is it the pleasure of the House that --

An hon member: No.

The Acting Speaker: No. Please, Mr Clerk, continue.

Clerk Assistant and Clerk of Journals: Candide Lake, Candler Lake, Candybar Creek, Candybar Lake, Candy Creek, Cane Lake, Canisbay Creek, Canisbay Lake, Canis Lake, Canister Creek, Canister Lake, Can Lake, Canna Creek, Canna Lake, Cannard's Bay, Canniff Creek, Canniff Lake, Canning Lake, Cannings Falls, Cannon Creek, Cannon Lake, Canoe Bay, Canoe Bay Channel, Canoe Channel, Canoe Creek, Canoe Lake, Canoeshed Lake, Canon Creek, Canon Lake, Canonto Lake, Can Opener Lake, Canterbury Lake, Canthook Lake, Cantin Lake, Cantley Creek, Cantley Lake, Canton Lake, Cantrill Lake, Canty Lake, Canvasback Lake, Canyon Creek, Canyon Falls, Canyon Lake, Canyon River, Cap Creek, Capee Lake, Cape Harbour, Cape Hurd Channel, Capella Lake, Capin Lake, Cap Lake, Capper Lake, Capre Lake, Capreol Lake, Capricornus Lake, Capsell Lake, Captain Lake, Captains Lake, Captain Tom Lake, Capton Lake, Caput Lake, Carafel Creek, Carafel Lake, Caragana Lake, Caramat Creek, Caramat Lake, Carcajou Bay, Carcajou Creek, Carcajou Lake, Carcass Lake, Card Bay, Carder Lake, Cardiff Creek, Cardiff Lake, Cardinal Creek, Cardinalis Lake, Cardinal Lake, Card Lake, Cards Lake, Cardwell Lake, Carew Lake, Carey Creek, Carey Lake, Carfrae Lake, Cargill Lake, Cargill Mill Pond, Carhess Creek, Cariad Lake, Carib Creek, Carib Lake, Cariboo Creek, Cariboo Lake, Caribou Bay, Caribou Creek, Caribou Lake, Caribou Rapids, Caribou River, Caribou Throat Lake, Caribus Lake, Carillon Rapids, Carkner Lake, Car Lake, Carl Bay, Carlbom Lake, Carl Creek, Carleton Lake, Carling Bay, Carling Lake, Carl Lake, Carlo Lake, Carlson Lake, Carlstead Bay, Carlton Lake, Carlyle Lake, Carman Bay, Carman Creek, Carman Lake, Carmichael Lake, Carnachan Bay, Carnahan Lake, Carney Creek, Carney Lake, Carnilac Lake, Caro Lake, Caroline Lake, Carol Lake, Carolyn Creek, Caron Creek, Caron Lake, Carpenter Lake, Carpenter River, Carpet Lake, Carp Lake, Carp River, Carre Lake, Carrick Creek, Carrick Lake, Carrie Lake, Carriere Lake, Carrigan Lake, Carrington Lake, Carroll Creek, Carroll Lake, Carroll Wood Bay, Carrot Lake, Carruthers Lake, Carrying Lake, Carry Lake, Carscallen Lake, Carson Bay, Carson Creek, Carson Lake, Carss Creek, Carstens Lake, Carswell Lake, Cartan Lake, Carter Bay, Carter Lake, Carter Rapids, Carthew Bay, Cartier Lake, Cartier Creek, Cart Lake, Cartwrights Creek, Carty Creek, Carty Lake, Carver Lake, Cascade Falls, Cascade Lake, Cascaden Lake, Cascade Rapids, Cascade River, Cascanette Lake, Case River, Casey Creek, Casey Lake, Casgrain Creek, Casgrain Lake, Cash Creek, Cashel Lake, Cashman Creek, Cashore Creek, Casingo Lake, Caskie Bay, Caskill Lake, Cask Lake, Casper Lake, Casque Lake, Cassdaga Lake, Casselman's Lake, Casselman's Creek, Cassels Lake, Cassidy Bay, Cassidy Creek, Cassidy Lake, Cassidys Bay, Cass Lake, Casson Lake, Castellar Creek, Castellar Lake, Castlebar Creek, Castlebar Lake, Castel Bay, Castle Creek, Castle Lake, Castleman Lake, Castlewood Creek, Castlewood Lake, Castor Creek, Castor Lake, Castoroil Lake, Castor Ponds, Castor River, Castra Lake, Casummit Lake, Caswell Bay, Caswell Lake, Cataract Falls, Cataract Lake, Cataraqui Bay, Cataraqui River, Catastrophe Creek, Catastrophe Lake, Catawba Lake, Cat Bay, Catchacoma Lake, Catcher Lake, Cat Creek, Caterpillar Lake, Cat Falls, Catfish Bay, Catfish Creek, Catfish Lake, Catfish Rapids, Catharine Lake, Cathro Lake, Cathy's Lake, Catlonite Creek, Catlonite Lake, Cat River, Cat Tail River, Cattral Lake, Cauchon Creek, Cauchon Lake, Caufield Lake, Cauley Lake, Cauliflower Creek, Cauliflower Lake, Caulkin Lake, Caution Lake, Cavalary Creek, Cavalary Lake, Cavanagh Lake, Cavan Creek Cavano Lake, Cave Harbour, Cave Lake, Cavell Creek, Cavell Lake, Cavendish Lake, Caverly's Bay, Cavern Creek, Cavern Lake, Cavers Bay, Cavers Creek, Cavers Lake, Caviar Lake, Cawanogami Lake, Cawdron Creek, Cawdron Lake, Cawing Lake, Cawston Lakes, Cawthra Creek, Caya's Lake, Cayer Creek, Cayer Lake, Cayiens Creek, Caysee Lake, Cayuga Creek, Cayuga Lake, Cebush Lake, Cecebe Lake, Cecil Creek, Cecile Lake, Cedar Bay, Cedarbough Lake, Cedarclump Lake, Cedar Creek, Cedar Falls, Cedargum Lake, Cedar Harbour, Cedar Lake, Cedar Rapids, Cedar River, Cedarskirt Lake, Cedric Lake, Cee Creek, Ceepee Lake, Celastruc Lake, Cellist Lake, Celt Creek, Celtis Lake, Celt Lake, Cemetery Creek, Cemetery Lake, Centennial Lake, Centralis Creek, Centralis Lake, Central Lake, Centre Channel, Centre Creek, Centre Falls, Centrefire Creek, Centrefire Lake, Centre Lake, Centreville Creek, Ceph Lake, Ceres Lake, Cerulean Lake, Cerullo Lake, Chabbie Lake, Chabbie River, Chabot Lake, Chadwick Lake, Chagma Lake, Chagnon Lake, Chaillon Lake, Chain Creek, Chain Lake, Chain Lakes, The Chain Lakes, Chainy Creek, Chainy Lake, Chair Lake, Chalet Creek, Chalet Lake, Chalice Lake, Chalk Bay, Chalk Creek, Chalkend Lake, Chalk Lake, Chalk River, Challener Lake, Challener River, Challis Lake, Chalmers Lake, Chamandy Lake, Chamberlain Lake, Chamber Lake, Chambers Lake, Champagne Lake, Champlain Creek, Champlain Trail Lakes, Chance Lake, Chancellor Lake, Chandos Lake, Change Lake, Chanley Lake, Channel Lake, Channel Lakes, Green River, Greenrod Lake, Greens Bay, Green's Creek, Greenshields Lake, Greenshore Lake, Greensides Lake, Greens Lake, Greenstone Rapids, Greensward Lake, Green Tree Lake, Greenwater Creek, Greenwater Lake, Greenwich Creek, Greenwich Lake, Greenwood Lake, Greenwood River, Greer Creek, Greer Lake, Greers Bay, Greggio Lake, Greggs Lake, Gregory Bay, Gregory Creek, Gregory Lake, Grehan Lake, Greig Lake, Gremm Lake, Grenadier Creek, Grenadier Lake, Grenadier Pond, Grenfell Lake, Grenier Lake, Grenville Lake, Greske Lake, Greta Lake, Gretchel Creek, Gretchel Lake, Gretel Creek, Gretel Lake, Grey Lake, Grew River, Grey Duck Lake, Grey Lake, Grelava Lake, Grey Owl Bay, Grew Owl Lake, Green Creek, Greengrass Lake, Greenheart Creek, Greenheart Lake, Greenhedge Lake, Greenhill Lake, Greenhill Rapids, Greenhill River, Greenhorn Bay, Greenhue Lake, Greening Lake, Greening's Bay, Greenish Creek, Greenish Lake, Green Island Bay, Green Island Lake, Green Lake, Green Lakes, Greenland Lake, Greenlaw Lake, Greenleaf Creek, Greenleaf Lake, Greenlee Lake, Greenmantle Lake, Greenmantle River, Greenock Creek, Greenock Lake, Greenough Harbour, Greenpike Lake, Gravel Lake, Gravel Lakes, Gravelly Bay, Gravelpit Lake, Gravel Pit Pond, Gravelridge Lake, Gravel River, Gravenor Lake, Graves Lake, Graveyard Creek, Graveyard Lake, Graveyard Rapids, Gravy Lake, Grawbarger Lake, Grawbarger's Rapids, Graydarl Lake, Graydon Lake, Gray Lake, Grayling Lake, Graymud Lake, Gray Rapids, Gray's Bay, Grays Creek, Grays Lake, Grayson Lake, Grayson River, Grays River, Graystone Lake, Graytrout Lake, Grazing Lake, Grazing River, Great Lake, Great Mountain Lake, Great North Bay, Great Portage Lake, Great South Bay, Grebe Lake, Greb Lake, Green Bay, Greenbough Lake, Green Bug Lake, Greenbush Lake, Green Creek, Grants Lake, Granzies Lake, Grape Lake, Graphic Creek, Graphic Lake, Graphite Lake, Grapnel Bay, Grapnel Creek, Grapnel Lake, Grasett Lake, Grass Creek, Grasser Lake, Grass Hill Lake, Grass Lake, Grassy Bay, Grassy Creek, Grassy Lake, Grassy Portage Bay, Grassy River, Gratton Creek, Gratton Lake, Grave Bay, Grave Creek, Grave Lake, Gravel Bay, Gravel Beach Lake, Gravel Falls, Graham Bay, Graham Creek, Graham Lake, Grahams Creek, Graham's Lake, Granary Creek, Granary Lake, Grand Bay, Grand Campment Bay, Grande Lake, Grandeur Lake, Grand Lake, Grandmaison Lake, Grandma Lake, Grandma Stevens Pond, Grandolph Bay, Grandpa Lake, Grandpop's Lake, Grand Rapids, Grand River, Grandview Lake, Granite Bay, Graniteboss Lake, Granite Creek, Granite Falls, Granitehill Lake, Granite Lake, Granite River, Granitic Lake, Granka Lake, Granny Bay, Granny's Creek, Grano Lake, Grant Bay, Grant Creek, Grant Lake, Grant Point Harbour, Grants Creek, Grants Creek Bay, Gosselin Creek, Gosselin Lake, Gosselin's Bay, Goss Lake, Goudreau Creek, Goudreau Lake, Goudy Creek, Goudy Lake, Gough Creek, Gough Lake, Gouinlock Lake, Gouin Lake, Goulais Bay, Goulais Lake, Goulais River, Gould Creek Goulding Lake, Goulet Bay, Goulet Creek, Goulet Lake, Gourlay Lake, Gourlie Creek, Govan Lake, Gove Lake, Gover Lake, Government Bay, Government Creek, Government Lake, Governor Bay, Gowan Creek, Gowan Lake, Gowar Bay, Goward Lake, Gowganda Bay, Gowganda Lake, Gowie Bay, Grabers Lake, Grab Lake, Grace Bay, Grace Creek, Graceful Lake, Grace Lake, Gracie Lake, Grady Lake, Graff Lake, Goose Lake, Goose Neck Bay, Gooseneck Creek, Gooseneck Lake, Gooseneck Rapids, Goose Pond, Goose River, Gord Lake, Gordon Bay, Gordon Creek, Gordon Lake, Gordon Rapids, Gordons Bay, Gordons Creek, Gore Bay, Gorge Creek, Gorge Creek Falls, Gorge Lake, Gorman Creek, Gorman Lake, Gorman River, Gormans Creek, Gormire Lake, Gormley Creek, Gormupkagama Lake, Gorrie Lake, Gorr Lakes, Gorse Creek, Gorse Lake, Gort Creek, Gort Lake, Goshawk Lake, Goshen Lake, Gosling Lake, Goldie Lake, Goldie River, Goldilocks Lake, Golding Lake, Gold Lake, Gold Mountain Lake, Goldsborough Creek, Goldsborough Lake, Gold Seekers Bay, Goldsmith Lake, Goldspink Lake, Goldstein Lake, Goldthrope Lake, Goldwin Creek, Goldwin Lake, Golf Course Bay, Golf Lake, Goltz Lake, Golub Lake, Gong Creek, Gong Lake, Gooch Creek, Gooch Lake, Goodchild Creek, Goodchild Lake, Goode Lake, Goodens Creek, Gooderham Creek, Gooderham Lake, Goodeve Lake, Goodfish Lake, Good Fortune Lake, Good Harbour, Goodie Creek, Goodie Lake, Goodier Lake, Goodkey Creek, Goodlad Lake, Good Lake, Goodliff Lake, Goodman Creek, Goodman Lake, Goodmorning Lakes, Goodoar Lake, Goodreau Lake, Goods Lake, Goodwill Lake, Goodwin Lake, Gooley Lake, Goosander Creek, Goosander Lake, Goose Bay, Gooseberry Brook, Gooseberry Creek, Gooseberry Lake, Goose Channel, Goose Creek, Goose Egg Lake, Gilder Creek, Gilder Lake, Glimmer Lake, Gling Lake, Gliskning Lake, Glitter Creek, Glitter Lake, Globe Creek, Globe Lake, Gloomy Lake, Glorious Lake, Glory Creek, Glory Lake, Glosser Bay, Gloucester Pool, Glover Bay, Glover Lake, Glovers Bay, Glue Lake, Glynn Lake, Gnat Lake, Gneiss Lake, Gneiss Rapids, Gnome Lake, Goat Creek, Goat Island Channel, Goat Lake, Goat River, Goblin Bay, Goblin Lake, Godda Lake, Goddard Lake, Godfrey Creek, Godfrey Lake, Godin Creek, Godin Lake, God's Lake, Godson Creek, Godson Lake, Goff Lake, Gog Lake, Gohere Bay, Go Home Bay, Go Home Lake, Go Home River, Going Lake, Golborne Lakes, Goldbar Lake, Gold Creek, Golden Creek, Goldeneye Lake, Golden Gate Lake, Golden Lake, Goldfield Creek, Goldfield Lake, Glass Falls, Glass Lake, Glassy Creek, Glassy Lake, Glay Lake, Glaze Lake, Gleason Brook, Gleason Lake, Gleave Lake, Gledhill Lake, Gleeson Lake, Glen Creek, Glendening Lake, Glen Erin Brook, Glenfield Creek, Glen Lake, Glenney Creek, Glenney Lake, Glenn Lake, Gillies Creek, Gillies Lake, Gilligan Creek, Gillin Lake, Gill Lake, Gillmor Lake, Gillnet Lake, Gill's Bay, Gilman Bay, Gilman Lake, Gilmour Bay, Gilmour Creek, Gilmour Lake, Gilroy Lake, Gilson Lake, Gilt Lake, Gimby Lake, Gimlet Lake, Gina Lake, Gin Creek, Ginger Lake, Gin Lake, Gin Lake, Ginozhe Bay, Gipsy Lake, Giraffe Creek, Giraffe Lake, Girardin Pond, Girard Lake, Girdlestone Bay, Giroux Creek, Giroux Lake, Giroux River, Girty Lake, Girvan Creek, Girvan Lake, Girvin Lake, Gitche Lake, Gitche River, Gittins Lake, Giunta Lake, Giving Lake, Giwshkwebi Bay, Glabb Lake, Glacier Creek, Glacier Lake, Glade Lake, Gladstone Lake, Gladwin Creek, Gladwin Lake, Gladys Lake, Glaister Creek, Glaister Lake, Gilmor Lake, Glanmire Creek, Glanmire Lake, Glasford Lake, Glasgow Lake, Glasgow Pond, Glass Bay, Glasser Lake, Gessie Lake, Ghee Lake, Ghost Bay, Ghost Creek, Ghost Lake, Ghost River, Giacomo Lake, Gibberry Lake, Gibb Lake, Gibboney Lake, Gibbons Lake, Gibi Lake, Gibraltar Bay, Gibraltar Lake, Gibson Creek, Gibson Lake, Gibson River, Gibsons Bay, Gibsons Lake, Gids Harbour, Giffins Lake, Gifford Bay, Gifford Lake, Gignac Lake, Giguere Lake, Gilbert Creek, Gilbert Lake, Gilboe Lake, Gilby Lake, Gilchrist Bay, Gilchrist Creek, Gilchrist Lake, Gilden Lake, Giles Bay, Gilhuly Lake, Gillard Lake, Gilleach Lake, Gilleran Lake, Genessee Bay, Genessee Lake, Geneva Creek, Geneva Lake, Genier Creek, Genier Lake, Gennis Lake, Genoa Creek, Genoa Lake, Genricks Lake, Gentian Creek, Gentian Lake, Gentleman Creek, Geoffrey Lake, Geoffrion Lake, Geometry Lake, Geordie Lake, Geordies Lake, George Creek, George Lake, Georges Bay, George's Lake, Georgia Lake, Georgian Bay, Georgie Creek, Georgina Lake, Geraldine Lake, Gerald Lake, Gerber Lake, Gerloch Creek, Gerrnan Bay, German Lake, German Mills Creek, Gerow Lake, Gerrard Lake, Gerry Creek, Gerry Lake, Gertrude Lake, Gervais Lake, Gervis Lake, Alfreda Creek, Alfreda Island, Alfreda Lake, Alfred Inlet, Alfred Lake, Algocen Lake, Algonquin Lake, Alguire Lake, Alice Creek, Alice Lake, Alike Lake, Alister Lake, Alijo Lake, Alkenore Lake, Allan Creek, Allan Lake, Allan Rapids, Callans Creek, Allard Lake, Allely Creek, Allely Lake, Allenby Creek, Allenby Lake, Allen Creek, Allen Lake, Allen Lakes, Allen Rapids, Allens Creek, Allens Lakes, Alligator Creek, Alligator Lake, Allingham Creek, Allin Lake, Allison Lake, Allman's Bay, Allumette Lake, Alluring Creek, Alma Creek, Alma Lake, Almas Bay, Alm Lake, Almon Lake, Almonte Lake, Almonte Rapids, Aloft Lake, Along Bay, Alona Bay Creek Alonghill Lake, Alpha Lake, Alph Creek, Alph Lake, Alphonse Bay, Alpine Lake, Alport Lake, Alps Creek, Alsever Lake, Alston Lake, Altar Lake, Altimeter Creek, Altimeter Lake, Altitude Lake, Altitude Creek, Alto Lake, Alton Lake, Alva Lake, Alves Bay, Alvin Lake, Alwyn Lake, Amabel Creek, Amable du Fond River, Amiable Lakes, Amaleen Lake, Amateewakea River, Amberley Beach, Ambrose Lake, Ambush Bay, Amelia Lake, Ameliasbury Mill Pond, Ament Bay, American Cabin Lake, American Channel, Ames Creek, Amesdale Lake, Ames Lake, Ameson Creek, Ameson Lake, Amethyst Bay, Amethyst Harbour, Amethyst Lake, Amewin River, Amherst Bay, Amherstbury Harbour, Amikeus Creek, Amikeus Lake, Amik Lake, Amikogaming Lake, Amikougami Creek, Amik River, Amisk Creek, Amit Lake, Amlin Lake, Amoeba Lake, Anos Creek, Anos Lake, Amphibolite Bay, Amp Lake, Amra Lake, Amundsen Creek, Amwri Creek Amwri Lake, Amy Falls, Amy Lake, Amylou Lake, Amyoa Creek, Amyoa Lake, Amyot Creek, Anaharea Creek, Anaharea Lake, Anahareo Creek, Anahareo Lake, Ana Lake, Anape Lake, Anaway Creek, Anaway Lake, Ancaster Creek, Anchicum Bay, Anchorage Bay, Anchor Lake, Ancliff Lake, Ancona Bay, Anders Lake, Anderson Creek, Anderson Lake, Anderson's Bay, Andre Creek, Andre Lake, Andress Lake, Andrew Bay, Andrew Lake, Andrews Bay, Caba Lake, Cabin Bay, Cabin Lake, Cabin Rapids, Cab Lake, Cable Creek, Cable Lake, Caboose Lake, Cabot Lake, Cache Bay, Cache Creek, Cachege Lake, Cache Lake, Cache Rapids, Cache River, Cadawaja Creek, Cadawaja Lake, Caddy Creek, Caddy Lake, Cadre Lake, Caesar Lake, Cahill Creek, Cahill Lake, Caibaiosai Lake, Cain Lake, Cairngorm Lake, Cairn Lake, Cairns Lake, Cairns River, Cairo Creek, Cairo Lake, Caithness Creek, Caithness Lake, Calabogie Lake, Calais Creek, Calais Lake, Calamity Creek, Calamity Lake, Calbeck Lake, Calbert Creek, Calcite Lake, Calcite Creek, Calcite Rapids, Cal Creek, Calder Creek, Calder Lake, Caldwell Lake, Caledon Creek, Caledonia Creek, Caledon Lake, Caley Lake, Calf Lake, Calf Rapids, Calhoun Lake, Caliper Lake, Callaghan Lake, Callahan Bay, Callahan Lake, Cal Lake, Callander Bay, Callery Lake, Callicut Lake, Callinan Lake, Call Lake, Calm Bay, Calm Lake, Calong Lake, Calpin Lake, Calstock Creek, Calstock Lake, Calumet Lake, Calverley's Pond, Calvert Creek, Calvert Lake, Calvin Lake, Calwin Falls, Camden Lake, Camel Lake, Camelot Lake, Camel Read Lake, Cameo Lake, Cameron Bay, Cameron Creek, Cameron Falls, Cameron Lake, Camerons Bay, Camerons Lake, Cameron's Pool, Cameroon Lake, Cam Lake, Cammack Lake, Camp Bay, Campbell Bay, Campbell Creek, Campbell Lake, Campbell's Bay, Campbell's Creek, Campbellville Pond, Campcot Lake, Camp Creek, Camp Eleven Lake, Camper Creek, Camp Lake, Camp Falls, Camp 50 Bay, Campfire Creek, Campfire Lake, Campfire River, Camp Five Lake, Camp Four Lake, Camp 14 Creek, Camp 14 Lake, Campground Lake, Camphouse Lake, Camping Lake, Campion Rapids, Camp Island Lake, Camp Lake, Camp Nine Creek, Camp Nine Lake, Camp One Bay, Camp One Lake, Campover Lake, Camp River, Camproad Creek, Camproad Lake, Camp 7 Bay, Camp 7 Lake, Camp 6 Bay, Camp Six Lake, Camp Six Rapids, Campstool Lake, Campten Bay, Camp Ten Bay, Camp Ten Lake, Camp 36 Lake, Camp Three Bay, Camp Three Lake, Camp Three Rapids, Camp Two Lake, Campus Creek, Campus Lake, Camrose Lake, Canada Jay Lake, Canadensis Lake, Canadian Channel, Canagagigue Creek, Cana Lake, Canal Bay, Aaron Creek, Aaron Lake, Abalard Creek, Abamasagi Lake, Abamategwia Lake, Abams Lake, Abate Lake, Abbe Creek, Abbe Lake, Abbess Lake, Abbey Creek, Abbey Dawn Creek, Abbey Lake, Abbie Lake, Abbotsford Creek, Abbotsford Lake, Abbott Creek, Abbott Lake, Abe Creek, Abelson Lake, Aberarder Creek, Aber Creek, Aberdeen Creek, Aberdeen Lake, Aberfoyle Creek, Aber Lake, Abernethy Lake, Abes Lake, Abie Lake, Abigogami Creek, Abigogami Lake, Abimatinu Lake, Abimatinu River, Abinette Lake, Abinette River, Abitibi River, Abitibi Lake, Abney Lake, Abram Lake, Abs Lake, Acanthus Lake, Ace Lake, Acer Lake, Achapi Lake, Acheson Lake, Achigan Creek, Achigan Lake, Acid Lake, Acker Lake, Ackert Drain, Acme Lake, Acolyte Lake, Aconda Lake, Acorn Lake, Acre Lake, Acton Lake, Acton Pond, Adagio Lake, Adair Creek, Adair Lake, Ada Lake, Adamac Lake, Adam Creek, Adamhay Lake, Adam Lake, Adam's Bay, Adams Creek, Adams Lake, Adamson Lake, Adams Pond, Adams River, Adams River Bay, Adanac Lake, Adanac Creek, Addie Lake, Addington Lake, Addison Lake, Add Lake, Adelaide Creek, Adelaide Lake, Adelard Lake, Adele Lake, Adel Lake, Adik Creek, Adik Lake, Adios Lake, Admiral Creek, Admiral Lake, Admit Lake, Adobe Lake, Adogio Lake, Adrains Creek, Adrian Lake, Adrienne Lake, Adventure Creek, Adventure Lake, Adze Lake, Aegean Creek, Aegean Lake, Aerial Lake, Aerobus Bay, Aerobus Creek, Aerobus Lake, Aerofoil Lake, Aeroplane Lake, Affleck Lake, A-Frame Lake, Again River, Agam Lake, Agar Lake, Agassiz Lake, Agate Creek, Agate Lake, Agawa Bay, Agawa Lake, Agawa River, Agawask Creek, Agimak Lake, Agnes Lake, Agnes River, Agnew Lake, Agonzon Lake, Agreen Lake, Aguasabon River, Aguasabon Lake, Ague Lake, Agusada Creek, Agusada Lake, Agusk Lake, Agutua Lake, Agutua River, Agwa Bay, Agwasuk River, Agwatik River, Ahdik Lake, Ahern Lake, Ahmabel Lake, Ahme Lake, Ahme Creek Ahmic Creek, Ahmic Lake, Ahsin Bay, Ahsine Creek, Ahsine Lake, Aide Creek, Aide Lake, Aidie Creek, Aikens Lake, Aikman Lake, Aileen Lake, Ainslie Lake, Air Base Bay, Aird Bay, Aird Lake, Airfield Creek, Air Hole Lake, Airplane Lake, Airport Drain, Airport Lake, Airstrip Lake, Airy Creek, Airy Lake, Aitken Creek, Aitken Lake, Ajax Lake, Akandamo Lakes, Akandamo River, Akebia Creek, Akebia Lake, Akey Lake, Aki Lake, Akin Lakes, Akonesi Creek, Akonesi Lake, Akonewi Lake, Akow Lake, Akron Creek, Akron Lake, Alabama Lake, A Lake, Alaska's Lake, Alba Lake, Albany River, Cox Bay, Cox Creek, Cox Lake, Cox's Lake, Coy Lake, Coyle Creek, Coyle Lake, Coyne Lake, Coyston Lake, CPR Bay, Crabclaw Creek, Crabclaw Lake, Crab Lake, Crabtree Lake, Cracknell Lake, Crackshot Lake, Craddock Creek, Craddock Lake, Cradle Creek, Cradle Lake, Craft Creek, Craft Lake, Crag Lake, Craig Lake, Craignative Lake, Craigs Creek, Craig's Swamp, Crain Lake, Crains Lake, Cramadog Creek, Cramadog Lake, Cramp Creek, Cramp Lake, Cranberry Bay, Cranberry Creek, Cranberry Lake, Chenier Lake, Cherie Creek, Cherniuk Lake, Cherries Bay, Cherrington Lake, Cherry Creek, Cherry Lake, Cherry River, Chesakan Creek, Chesakan Lake, Chesley Lake, Chesney Bay, Chesterfield Bay, Chesterfield Creek, Chesterfield Lake, Chester Lake, Chewink Creek, Chewink Lake, Chiah Lake, Chiblow Lake, Chicago Bay, Chicault Lake, Chickadee Lake, Chicken Farm Lake, Chicken Liver Channel, Chick Lake, Chicobi Lake, Chicot Lake, Chief Bay, Chief Creek, Chief Lake, Chief Peter Lake, Chief's Creek, Chiki Lake, Chilcott Lake, Childerhorse Creek, Childerhorse Lake, Chill Creek, Chill Lake, Chilton Lake, Chimahagan River, Chime Lake, China Lake, Chin Creek, Chiniguchi River, Chiniguchi Lake, Chin Lake, Chin River, Chipai River, Chipai Lake, Chipchase Lake, Chipican Lake, Chip Lake, Chipman Lake, Chipmunk Creek, Chipmunk Lake, Chippawa Channel, Chippego Lake, Chippewa Creek, Chippy Lake, Chisamore Lake, Chisholm Drain, Chit Lake, Fade Lake, Fagan Lake, Fagan Ponds, Fagus Bay, Fahey Lake, Fairbairn Creek, Fairbairn Lake, Fairbanks Creek, Fairchild Creek, Fairchild Lake, Faircloth Lake, Fairholme Lake, Fair Lake, Fairloch Lake, Fairplay Lake, Fairs Creek, Fairview Creek, Fairy Creek, Fairy Lake, Faith Lake, Fakeloo Lake, Fakeloo Creek, Falan Lake, Falby Lake, Falcon Lake, Fall Creek, Fallduck Lakes, Fallen Creek, Fallen Lake, Fall-In-Lake, Fallis Pond, Fall Lake, Fallon Island, Falloon Lake, Fall River, Fallscamp Creek, Fallscamp Lake, Falls Lake, Falls River, False Creek, False Lake, Falsetto Lake, Fan Lake, Fanny Lake, Fanshawe Lake, Fansher Lake, Faraday Creek, Faraday Lake, Farah Lake, Farden Lake, Farewell Bay, Farewell Lake, Faries Lake, Faris Lake, Farlain Lake, Far Lake, Farlane Lake, Farlette Lake, Farley Lake, Farleys Creek, Farlinger Lake, Farm Bay, Farm Bay Lake, Farm Creek, Farmer Lake, Farm Lake, Farncomb Lake, Farncomb Creek, Farner Lake, Farnes Lake, Farnham Creek, Farquhar Creek, Farquhar Lake, Farr Creek, Farrel Creek, Farrel Lake, Farrell Lake, Farrer Lake, Farrington Lake, Farrington Creek, Farrow Lake, Farwell Creek, Fassett Lake, Fatima Lake, Fat Lake, Fat River, Fatty Creek, Fatty Lake, Faubert Lake, Faulkenham Lake, Faulk Lake, Faulkner Lake, Fault Creek, Fault Lake, Faultside Lake, Fauquier Lake, Favel Bay, Favel Lake, Favell Bay, Favot Creek, Favot Creek, Fawcett Lake, Fawn Creek, Fawn Lake, Fawthrop Lake, Faya Lake, Feagan Lake, Fear Lake, Fearless Lake, Feather Lake, Feather River, Feaver Lake, Fecteau Lake, Fee Lake, Feely Creek, Feely Lake, Feeny Lake, Feeny Lake, Feist Creek, Feist Lake, Felcite Lake, Feldman Lake, Feline Lake, Felix Lake, Fells Bay, Felsen Creek, Felsen Lake, Felst Lake, Felt Lake, Felto Lake, Fenelon River, Fen Lake, Fennah Lake, Fennell Lake, Fenn Lake, Fenson Lake, Fenton Lake, Fergus Lake, Fergus Creek, Ferguson Lake, Ferguson Bay, Ferguson Creek, Ferguson Drain, Fergusons Lake, Ferland's Lake, Fermoy Lake, Fern Creek, Ferndale Bay, Fern Lake, Fernley Drain, Fernlund Lake, Fernow Lake, Fernow River, Ferns Lake, Ferrier Creek, Ferrie River, Ferrim Lake, Ferris Lake, Festuca Lake, Fetter Lake, Fewster Drain, Fib Lake, Ficht Lake, Fiddler Lake, Fidler River, Fido Lake, Field's Lake, Fife Lake, Fifteen Lake, Fifteen Mile Creek, Fifteen Mile Lake, Fifteen Mile Pond, Fifth Lake, Fifty Creek, Fifty Dollar Lake, Fifty Nine Lake, Fifty Two Lake, Fillet Creek, Fillet Lake, Fillion Lake, Fills Lake, Film Lake, Filter Creek, Filter Lake, Final Lake, Fin Bay, Finch Lake, Fin Creek, Findlay Creek, Findlay Creek, Findlay Lake, Fine Lake, Finger Bay, Finger Lake, Finish Lake, Fink Lake, Fin Lake, Finland Creek, Finlay Bay, Finlay Creek, Finlayson Creek, Finlayson Lake, Finnegan Lake, Finney Creek, Finney Lake, Finn Lake, Finton Lake, Fintry Creek, Fire Creek, Firefly Creek, Firefly Lake, Fire Hill Creek, Fire Hill Lake, Fire Lake, Fireline Lake, Firella Creek, Fire River, Firesand River, Firesteel River, Firetail Creek, Firetail Lake, Fir Lake, Firman's Creek, First Concession Drain, First Creek, First Depot Lake, First Egan Lake, First Government Lake, First James Lake, First Justin Lake, First Kargus Lake, First Lake, First Loon Creek, First Loon Lake, Firth Creek, Firth Lake, Fischer Lake, Fishbasket Lake.

Loi réclamant la ministre de l'environnement de libérer ses responsabilités sous l'article 15(1) de la Loi sur les ressources en eau de l'Ontario a fin de déterminer le contenu des moules zébrées du:

Cana Lake, Canal Bay, Canal Lake, Canard Lake, Canard River, Canary Lake, Cancer Lake, Candide Creek, Candide Lake, Candler Lake --

The Acting Speaker: Is it the pleasure of the House that we dispense with the reading of this bill? No, we do not have unanimous consent. Please proceed, Mr Clerk.

Clerk Assistant and Clerk of Journals: -- Candybar Creek, Candybar Lake, Candy Creek, Cane Lake, Canisbay Creek, Canisbay Lake, Canis Lake, Canister Creek, Canister Lake, Can Lake, Canna Creek, Canna Lake, Cannard's Bay, Canniff Creek, Canniff Lake, Canning Lake, Cannings Falls, Cannon Creek, Cannon Lake, Canoe Bay, Canoe Bay Channel, Canoe Channel, Canoe Creek, Canoe Lake, Canoeshed Lake, Canon Creek, Canon Lake, Canonto Lake, Can Opener Lake, Canterbury Lake, Canthook Lake, Cantin Lake, Cantley Creek, Cantley Lake, Canton Lake, Cantrill Lake, Canty Lake, Canvasback Lake, Canyon Creek, Canyon Falls, Canyon Lake, Canyon River, Cap Creek, Capee Lake, Cape Harbour, Cape Hurd Channel, Capella Lake, Capin Lake, Cap Lake, Capper Lake, Capre Lake, Capreol Lake, Capricornus Lake, Capsell Lake, Captain Lake, Captains Lake, Captain Tom Lake, Capton Lake, Caput Lake, Carafel Creek, Carafel Lake, Caragana Lake, Caramat Creek, Caramat Lake, Carcajou Bay, Carcajou Creek, Carcajou Lake, Carcass Lake, Card Bay, Carder Lake, Cardiff Creek, Cardiff Lake, Cardinal Creek, Cardinalis Lake, Cardinal Lake, Card Lake, Cards Lake, Cardwell Lake, Carew Lake, Carey Creek, Carey Lake, Carfrae Lake, Cargill Lake, Cargill Mill Pond, Carhess Creek, Cariad Lake, Carib Creek, Carib Lake, Cariboo Creek, Cariboo Lake, Caribou Bay, Caribou Creek, Caribou Lake, Caribou Rapids, Caribou River, Caribou Throat Lake, Caribus Lake, Carillon Rapids, Carkner Lake, Car Lake, Carl Bay, Carlbom Lake, Carl Creek, Carleton Lake, Carling Bay, Carling Lake, Carl Lake, Carlo Lake, Carlson Lake, Carlstead Bay, Carlton Lake, Carlyle Lake, Carman Bay, Carman Creek, Carman Lake, Carmichael Lake, Carnachan Bay, Carnahan Lake, Carney Creek, Carney Lake, Carnilac Lake, Caro Lake, Caroline Lake, Carol Lake, Carolyn Creek, Caron Creek, Caron Lake, Carpenter Lake, Carpenter River, Carpet Lake, Carp Lake, Carp River, Carre Lake, Carrick Creek, Carrick Lake, Carrie Lake, Carriere Lake, Carrigan Lake, Carrington Lake, Carroll Creek, Carroll Lake, Carroll Wood Bay, Carrot Lake, Carruthers Lake, Carrying Lake, Carry Lake, Carscallen Lake, Carson Bay, Carson Creek, Carson Lake, Carss Creek, Carstens Lake, Carswell Lake, Cartan Lake, Carter Bay, Carter Lake, Carter Rapids, Carthew Bay, Cartier Lake, Cartier Creek, Cart Lake, Cartwrights Creek, Carty Creek, Carty Lake, Carver Lake, Cascade Falls, Cascade Lake, Cascaden Lake, Cascade Rapids, Cascade River, Cascanette Lake, Case River, Casey Creek, Casey Lake, Casgrain Creek, Casgrain Lake, Cash Creek, Cashel Lake, Cashman Creek, Cashore Creek, Casino Lake, Caskie Bay, Caskill Lake, Cask Lake, Casper Lake, Casque Lake, Cassdaga Lake, Casselman's Lake, Casselman's Creek, Cassels Lake, Cassidy Bay, Cassidy Creek, Cassidy Lake, Cassidys Bay, Cass Lake, Casson Lake, Castellar Creek, Castellar Lake, Castlebar Creek, Castlebar Lake, Castle Bay, Castle Creek, Castle Lake, Castleman Lake, Castlewood Creek, Castlewood Lake, Castor Creek, Castor Lake, Castoroil Lake, Castor Ponds, Castor River, Castra Lake, Casummit Lake, Caswell Bay, Caswell Lake, Cataract Falls, Cataract Lake, Cataraqui Bay, Cataraqui River, Catastrophe Creek, Catastrophe Lake, Catawba Lake, Cat Bay, Catchacoma Lake, Catcher Lake, Cat Creek, Caterpillar Lake, Cat Falls, Catfish Bay, Catfish Creek, Catfish Lake, Catfish Rapids, Catharine Lake, Cathro Lake, Cathy's Lake, Catlonite Creek, Catlonite Lake, Cat River, Cat Tail River, Cattral Lake, Cauchon Creek, Cauchon Lake, Caulfield Lake, Cauley Lake, Cauliflower Creek, Cauliflower Lake, Caulkin Lake, Caution Lake, Cavalary Creek, Cavalary Lake, Cavanagh Lake, Cavan Creek, Cavano Lake, Cave Harbour, Cave Lake, Cavell Creek, Cavell Lake, Cavendish Lake, Caverly's Bay, Cavern Creek, Cavern Lake, Cavers Bay, Cavers Creek, Cavers Lake, Caviar Lake, Cawanogami Lake, Cawdron Creek, Cawdron Lake, Cawing Lake, Cawston Lakes, Cawston Lakes, Cawthra Creek, Caya's Lake, Cayer Creek, Cayer Lake, Cayiens Creek, Caysee Lake, Cayuga Creek, Cayuga Lake, Cebush Lake, Cecebe Lake, Cecil Creek, Cecile Lake, Cedar Bay, Cedarbough Lake, Cedarclump Lake, Cedar Creek, Cedar Falls, Cedargum Lake, Cedar Harbour, Cedar Lake, Cedar Rapids, Cedar River, Cedarskirt Lake, Cedric Lake, Cee Creek, Ceepee Lake, Celastruc Lake, Cellist Lake, Celt Creek, Celtis Lake, Celt Lake, Cemetery Creek, Cemetery Lake, Centennial Lake, Centralis Creek, Centralis Lake, Central Lake, Centre Channel, Centre Creek, Centre Falls, Centrefire Creek, Centrefire Lake, Centre Lake, Centreville Creek, Ceph Lake, Ceres Lake, Cerulean Lake, Cerullo Lake, Chabbie Lake, Chabbie River, Chabot Lake, Chadwick Lake, Chagma Lake, Chagnon Lake, Chaillon Lake, Chain Creek, Chain Lake, Chain Lakes, The Chain of Lakes, Chainy Creek, Chainy Lake, Chair Lake, Chalet Creek, Chalet Lake, Chalice Lake, Chalk Bay, Chalk Creek, Chalkend Lake, Chalk Lake, Chalk River, Challener Lake, Challener River, Challis Lake, Chalmers Lake, Chamandy Lake, Chamberlain Lake, Chamber Lake, Chambers Lake, Champagne Lake, Champlain Creek, Champlain Trail Lakes, Chance Lake, Chancellor Lake, Chandos Lake, Change Lake, Chanley Lake, Channel Lake, Channel Lakes, Green River, Greenrod Lake, Greens Bay, Green's Creek, Greenshields Lake, Greenshore Lake, Greensides Lake, Greens Lake, Greenstone Rapids, Greensward Lake, Green Tree Lake, Greenwater Creek, Greenwater Lake, Greenwich Creek, Greenwich Lake, Greenwood Lake, Greenwood River, Greer Creek, Greer Lake, Greers Bay, Greggio Lake, Greggs Lake, Gregory Bay, Gregory Creek, Gregory Lake, Grehan Lake, Greig Lake, Gremm Lake, Grenadier Creek, Grenadier Lake, Grenadier Pond, Grenfell Lake, Grenier Lake, Grenville Lake, Greske Lake, Greta Lake, Gretchel Creek, Gretchel Lake, Gretel Creek, Gretel Lake, Grew Lake, Grew River, Grey Duck Lake, Grey Lake, Grelava Lake, Grey Owl Bay, Grey Owl Lake, Green Creek, Greengrass Lake, Greenheart Creek, Greenheart Lake, Greenhedge Lake, Greenhill Lake, Greenhill Rapids, Greenhill River, Greenhorn Bay, Greenhue Lake, Greening Lake, Greening's Bay, Greenish Creek, Greenish Lake, Green Island Bay, Green Island Lake, Green Lake, Green Lakes, Greenland Lake, Greenlaw Lake, Greenleaf Creek, Greenleaf Lake, Greenlee Lake, Greenmantle Lake, Greenmantle River, Greenock Creek, Greenock Lake, Greenough Harbour, Greenpike Lake, Gravel Lake, Gravel Lakes, Gravelly Bay, Gravelpit Lake, Gravel Pit Pond, Gravelridge Lake, Gravel River, Gravenor Lake, Graves Lake, Graveyard Creek, Graveyard Lake, Graveyard Rapids, Gravy Lake, Grawbarger Lake, Grawbarger's Rapids, Graydarl Lake, Graydon Lake, Gray Lake, Grayling Lake, Graymud Lake, Gray Rapids, Grays Bay, Grays Creek, Grays Lake, Grayson Lake, Grayson River, Grays River, Graystone Lake, Graytrout Lake, Grazing Lake, Grazing River, Great Lake, Great Mountain Lake, Great North Bay, Great Portage Lake, Great South Bay, Grebe Lake, Greb Lake, Green Bay, Greenbough Lake, Green Bug Lake, Greenbush Lake, Green Creek, Grants Lake, Granzies Lake, Grape Lake, Graphic Creek, Graphic Lake, Graphite Lake, Grapnel Bay, Grapnel Creek, Grapnel Lake, Grasett Lake, Grass Creek, Grasser Lake, Grass Hill Lake, Grass Lake, Grassy Bay, Grassy Creek, Grassy Lake, Grassy Portage Bay, Grassy River, Gratton Creek, Gratton Lake, Grave Bay, Grave Creek, Grave Lake, Gravel Bay, Gravel Beach Lake, Gravel Falls, Graham Bay, Graham Creek, Graham Lake, Grahams Creek, Graham's Lake, Granary Creek, Granary Lake, Grand Bay, Grand Campment Bay, Grande Lake, Grandeur Lake, Grand Lake, Grandmaison Lake, Grandma Lake, Grandma Stevens Pond, Grandolph Bay, Grandpa Lake, Grandpop's Lake, Grand Rapids, Grand River, Grandview Lake, Granite Bay, Graniteboss Lake, Granite Creek, Granite Falls, Granitehill Lake, Granite Lake, Granite River --

The Acting Speaker: Is it the pleasure of the House that we dispense with the completion of the reading of this bill?

An hon member: No.

The Acting Speaker: I hear a negative.

Clerk Assistant and Clerk of Journals: -- Granitic Lake, Granka Lake, Granny Bay, Granny's Creek, Grano Lake, Grant Bay, Grant Creek Grant Lake, Grant Point Harbour, Grants Creek, Grants Creek Bay, Gosselin Creek, Gosselin Lake, Gosselin's Bay, Goss Lake, Goudreau Creek, Goudreau Lake, Goudy Creek, Goudy Lake, Gough Creek, Gough Lake, Gouinlock Lake, Gouin Lake, Goulais Bay, Goulais Lake, Goulais River, Gould Creek, Goulding Lake, Goulet Bay, Goulet Creek, Goulet Lake, Gourd Lake, Gourlay Lake, Gourlie Creek, Govan Lake, Gove Lake, Gover Lake, Government Bay, Government Creek, Government Lake, Governor Bay, Gowan Creek, Gowan Lake, Gowar Bay, Goward Lake, Gowganda Bay, Gowganda Lake, Gowie Bay, Grabers Lake, Grab Lake, Grace Bay, Grace Creek, Graceful Lake, Grace Lake, Gracie Lake, Grady Lake, Graff Lake, Goose Lake, Goose Neck Bay, Gooseneck Creek --

The Acting Speaker: Is it the pleasure of the House that we dispense reading? Do we have unanimous consent?

Agreed to.

The Acting Speaker: The motion is for first reading of the bill. All those in favour?

Motion agreed to.

La motion est adoptée.

The House adjourned at 1802.

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